Essay – PC Lunwen http://pclunwen.com/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 13:48:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://pclunwen.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/favicon.png Essay – PC Lunwen http://pclunwen.com/ 32 32 [Reader’s Essay] Oreum – A Service Learning Initiative https://pclunwen.com/readers-essay-oreum-a-service-learning-initiative/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 06:58:46 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/readers-essay-oreum-a-service-learning-initiative/ David Kelly Service Learning Coordinator and Department Head – Arts Branksome Hall Asia Service learning and service action are most often associated with large-scale, highly visible events and causes related to humanity and the environment. As an international school located in Jeju, since the establishment of Branksome Hall Asia, the school has been involved in […]]]>

David Kelly
Service Learning Coordinator and Department Head – Arts
Branksome Hall Asia

Service learning and service action are most often associated with large-scale, highly visible events and causes related to humanity and the environment. As an international school located in Jeju, since the establishment of Branksome Hall Asia, the school has been involved in many such projects through grade level programs, CASE extracurricular activities, service internships international events and special event days. These activities encourage students to be outward-looking and actively involved in worthwhile causes.

However, for student involvement to be truly meaningful and contribute to student learning, action must go beyond simply “performing” the service. There must be a genuine understanding of need, genuine selflessness, and a personal commitment to the ethic of service. To that end, we introduced a new curriculum at the school this year that encourages students to first perform service in a more intimate and local way. Also partly in response to the limitations caused by Covid-19 restrictions, we have been looking for ways for students to apply the spirit of service to their peers within the school.

the Oreum program pairs a middle school class with one or two middle school advisory classes for activities that bring them together at different times of the school year. The name of the program refers to the many oreum (small hills) that distinguish Jeju’s landscape and the students’ ascent throughout their school years, celebrating how this journey can be mutually enhanced by sharing it with others . The experience of middle school students who have already traversed the lower slopes of their education is invaluable to undergraduates as they take their first steps, and the role of mentor for middle school students is one that provides them with a valuable opportunity. for practical leadership.

Activities are sometimes undertaken at agreed times where the whole school is involved and at other times organized independently between partner classes. Although only in its infancy, the hallways have already echoed with delighted laughter and activity from cooking, trust games, storytelling, sports and music. As the program evolves and expands, it is planned to include academic tutoring, external service activities, parent involvement, and high school student involvement. The specifics of how classes interact are largely determined and organized by students in response to what they discover as needs, reinforcing their understanding of the fundamental requirement of any larger-scale service delivery.

All learning is a journey, with each step needing to be well placed and connected to the next, advancing to the end of the previous one. By identifying the essential components of this process and ensuring that they are grounded, the ethic of service can be established in students’ core beliefs at an early age. It may be small to begin with. Spontaneous acts of kindness. Share a toy or snack. Consider the feelings of others. Listen. These are simple social skills, but they are at the heart of service-learning if it is to become authentic service action.

While large-scale public acts of service related to large-scale issues are most often what we see and associate with service-learning, the key to meeting such large-scale challenges is motivation and commitment. genuine commitment of individuals. Encouraging students to interact with their peers at all age levels breeds empathy, patience, leadership, ambitious thinking, diverse language skills, creativity, and selflessness. By negotiating this Oreum, everyone involved supports and is supported in their ascent, preparing them for the mountains that inevitably await them.

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What are the 5 films to watch for inspiration when writing an essay? https://pclunwen.com/what-are-the-5-films-to-watch-for-inspiration-when-writing-an-essay/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 16:37:58 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/what-are-the-5-films-to-watch-for-inspiration-when-writing-an-essay/ Writing, in general, is a niche that requires a certain level of creativity, imagination, education, vocabulary, and inspiration. With all of this combined, people become able to create remarkable works of art and masterpieces that will last for a long time. Each individual can motivate themselves through dozens of different things. And one of them […]]]>

Writing, in general, is a niche that requires a certain level of creativity, imagination, education, vocabulary, and inspiration. With all of this combined, people become able to create remarkable works of art and masterpieces that will last for a long time. Each individual can motivate themselves through dozens of different things. And one of them is, of course, the movies. It’s fair to say that there isn’t any human being who doesn’t like to watch them, at least occasionally. Whether it’s a beautiful comedy that will make our day so much better and cause huge stomach pain from the constant laughter, or a scary horror movie that will make our hearts beat faster, it’s easy to see. ‘inspire by simply looking at them. A lot of creative ideas can be found in this action. This is the reason why some of the world’s bestsellers have become exactly that – the best-selling coins on the planet. Writers find films to be a great source of inspiring thoughts and the fact that thousands of films have been created according to books goes there. Anyway, let’s see which are the top 5 movies you should see for some inspiration for writing your essay.

The first movie on our list will be Casper, a world-famous humble and kind ghost who is inevitably a part of every child’s growth. You can read some of the legitimate essay writing services at JPost on the reviews of this kind of film and on the reactions of the people. Indeed, it’s a children’s film, but it’s arguably the most elegantly composed children’s film, adjusting parody, spectacle, and activity to make a family-friendly crossover film that adjusts youthful humor. and adults.

The disappearance can be an interesting subject to cover in a children’s film. Casper makes the passage an extremely enjoyable subject. Everyone kicks the bucket. Here and there at 12. Here and there at 30. Here and there at 80. It is how you conduct your life in the time allotted to you that is important. This movie shows how a story doesn’t have to be tied to a class type, and the characters can be funny one moment and dismal the next. It is still reasonable and natural to have a practical world and individuals populate the dream story you are trying to tell. As a youth essayist, I go to this film regularly to help me stir up delicate subjects with tenderness and accuracy.

Of course, movies that portray love in all its beauty are always great sources of creative thinking. This is the reason why “Shakespeare in love” should be your next pick to inspire you. Many essays include love in one form or another. Therefore, it surely won’t be a mistake to watch this movie and find some inspirational quotes. This film can be considered perhaps the best film on composition and is referenced in the vast majority of arrangements of top films on academics, including the BBC. The film is imperative not only because of its compelling plot and happy frame of mind, but also because it touches on the subject of the creative cycle, inspiration, motivation and innovation. In the film, the fundamental person fights against the composition block and is suddenly propelled. The image is about inspiration, dreaming, devotion and inventive approach, and can be seen as a clear requirement for watching film for any author.

Have you ever heard of a academic writing company at Mercurynews is it worth reading? Well you should have so far. Many of them gladly represent great works of art on writing techniques, skills, what to pay attention to in essays, etc. But more importantly, you can find essays on movies like “Genius” which are another source of inspiration. What does this particular piece of cinematography offer essayists? An ideal film for people who have not understood how to compose short papers. Being wordy isn’t wrong, but it’s pretty close. Your teacher continues to let you know that you need to change your papers, erase the excessive summaries, but instead you feel that every part is essential and that you should not give up on it. Assuming this story is close to your existence, then at this point this movie is most definitely something you must watch.

As the name of this film can indicate, its creators wanted people to get closer to the works of writers and how they can adapt writing styles to different situations. As an essay writer this is surely something that will surely be of great value to own. This work can be seen as both dramatization and satire, and its plot centers entirely on an essayist’s work on turning a novel into a screenplay. Such a job is really uncomfortable and even feels like a battle, especially having a mental obstacle which is the main subject of the films as well as the lack of motivation. These gloomy idiosyncrasies are the other side of the coin in being an essayist, so this film will resonate in the psyche of many writers.

The last movie on our short list that we’re going to cover is called “Garden Gate”. The key point of this film centers on a young individual’s return from the mothers’ funeral and how he struggles with emotions and memories of the past. It can be a reservoir of interesting thoughts for essay writers. This emotional story is a very fashionable and sometimes idiosyncratic person, but there is a message spread everywhere. We cannot go on with life numb with the feeling of refraining from torment and languishing. The plot of this story is difficult to clarify without going scene by scene. All things considered, it’s a development of individual minutes that elicits a thank you and a circular segment for the hero, Andrew Largeman.

Conclusion

All in all, it has to be said that there are literally hundreds of thousands of movies out there that can impact your imagination and kickstart a process of writing great essays. We have tried to provide you with a few of them which are highly rated in this area. If our suggestions show good results, you will know that you did not go wrong by following them.

Featured Image Credit: Pexels

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Potlatch Brindle Beckner, Grade 7 Student, Ranks 1st in Idaho State VFW Patriot Pen Essay Contest | Idaho https://pclunwen.com/potlatch-brindle-beckner-grade-7-student-ranks-1st-in-idaho-state-vfw-patriot-pen-essay-contest-idaho/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 21:36:00 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/potlatch-brindle-beckner-grade-7-student-ranks-1st-in-idaho-state-vfw-patriot-pen-essay-contest-idaho/ POTLATCH – We would like to join the Potlatch School District in congratulating 7th grade student Brindle Beckner for receiving 1st place in the VFW Patriot Pen Writing Contest in the State of Idaho. Brindle’s essay titled “How to be a Good American” will now be entered in the national portion of the contest in […]]]>

POTLATCH – We would like to join the Potlatch School District in congratulating 7th grade student Brindle Beckner for receiving 1st place in the VFW Patriot Pen Writing Contest in the State of Idaho.

Brindle’s essay titled “How to be a Good American” will now be entered in the national portion of the contest in Washington, DC

Held nationwide, the VFW Patriots Pen Contest is a youth writing competition open to grades 6, 7 and 8, giving them the opportunity to write essays expressing their views on a patriotic theme. annual. The 2021-22 theme is “How Can I Be a Good American?” “






How does the competition work?

Essays typically have between 300 and 400 written words. The competition consists of four levels. The first level (entry) is sponsored by local VFW stations. Position winners advance, one for every 15 entries, to the VFW district (regional) level where the first winner is advanced to the VFW department (state) level. The first place winner at the department level is then advanced into the national VFW competition. The winner from each department (state) then competes for the national prizes.

National winners will receive at least $ 500. The national first place prize is currently $ 5,000.

The Governor of Idaho.  Little to deliver in-person state of the state speech on Capitol Hill on Monday

The reconvening of the Idaho legislature in November cost taxpayers more than $ 46,000

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Can robots inherit human prejudices? Yes. Now evil has a face. https://pclunwen.com/can-robots-inherit-human-prejudices-yes-now-evil-has-a-face/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 20:07:14 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/can-robots-inherit-human-prejudices-yes-now-evil-has-a-face/ People might not notice artificial intelligence in their everyday life, but it is there. AI is now used to review mortgage applications and sort resumes to find a small pool of suitable candidates before scheduling job interviews. AI systems organize content for every individual on Facebook. Phone calls to customer services of cable operators, utilities, […]]]>

People might not notice artificial intelligence in their everyday life, but it is there. AI is now used to review mortgage applications and sort resumes to find a small pool of suitable candidates before scheduling job interviews. AI systems organize content for every individual on Facebook. Phone calls to customer services of cable operators, utilities, and banks, among other institutions, are processed by AI-based voice recognition systems.

This “invisible” AI can, however, make itself visible in unexpected and sometimes disturbing ways. In 2018, Amazon phased out some of its AI recruiting software because it demonstrated a prejudice against women. As reported by Reuters, Amazon’s own machine learning specialists realized their algorithm training data had been pulled from resume templates submitted over 10 years when men dominated the software industry.

ProPublica has found problems with a risk assessment tool that is widely used in the criminal justice system. The machine is designed to predict recidivism (relapse into criminal behavior) in the prison population. Risk estimates incorrectly identified African-American defendants as being more likely to commit future crimes than Caucasian defendants.

These unintended consequences were less of a problem in the past, as every piece of software logic was explicitly hand-coded, reviewed and tested. AI algorithms, on the other hand, learn from existing examples without relying on explicit rule-based programming. This is a useful approach when there is sufficient and accurately representative data and when it can be difficult or expensive to model the rules by hand – for example, being able to distinguish between a cat or a cat. a dog in a picture. But, depending on various circumstances, this methodology can lead to problems.

There is growing concern that AI sometimes generates distorted views of topics, leading to bad decisions. In order for us to effectively shape the future of technology, we must study and understand its anthropology.

The concept of distorted data can be too abstract to grasp, making it difficult to identify. After the Congressional hearings on Facebook, I felt there was a need for greater awareness of these concepts among the general public.

Art can help create this awareness. In a photographic project called “Human Trials”, I created an artistic representation of this distortion based on possible portraits of people who do not exist, created using AI algorithms.

Stay with me as I explain how I did the portraits.



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Women filling prisons in Argentina for drug offenses – a photographic essay | Argentina https://pclunwen.com/women-filling-prisons-in-argentina-for-drug-offenses-a-photographic-essay-argentina/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 08:02:00 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/women-filling-prisons-in-argentina-for-drug-offenses-a-photographic-essay-argentina/ Paola left her home when she was 13 to escape abuse and violence. She lived on the streets for five years until she got pregnant. Her boyfriend left her when he found out. Without work or food, Paola agreed to sell drugs to a leader in the neighborhood. She only had to deliver the drugs […]]]>

Paola left her home when she was 13 to escape abuse and violence. She lived on the streets for five years until she got pregnant. Her boyfriend left her when he found out. Without work or food, Paola agreed to sell drugs to a leader in the neighborhood.

She only had to deliver the drugs when her boss’ clients appeared on a street corner. With the money she earned in the first few months, she was able to rent a room and live there with her newborn baby. With a new partner and the basic needs of her family covered, she felt she could give up her job as a trader.

Sonia, 38, wears makeup in her cell, she is detained accused of drug trafficking, still without a final conviction

  • Above, Paola, 35, bakes fried cakes for relatives who come to visit her. Above, Sonia, 38, puts on make-up in her cell. She is detained, accused of drug trafficking, without final conviction. Right, a count of inmates in ward two of Unit 47. Far right, Sharon, 38, waits in her cell for officers to enter to count the inmates.

A count of the number of women detained
Sharon, 38, waits in her cell for the police to enter to count the prisoners

She had two more children and life seemed to be working out. But her partner left and Paola started selling drugs again to feed her three children. Again, the job seemed easy and the money started to flow: “What I earned in a month with drugs, I earned in six months by cleaning houses.

A pattern is developing in Latin America: Aggressive drug policies fill the region’s prisons with women, many of whom are forced into the drug trade because they have no other alternatives to support themselves. of their family.

Yanet, 28, jailed for drug dealing, celebrates birthday with her children during visit
Giuliana, 20, jailed for selling marijuana, kisses her mother on visit
Nahir, 19, plays with Estela, 30, whom she considers her big sister in prison

  • Above, Yanet, 28, imprisoned for selling drugs, celebrates her birthday with her children during a visit. Top left, 20-year-old Giuliana, jailed for selling marijuana, kisses her mother during a visit. Top right, 19-year-old Nahir plays with 30-year-old Estela, whom she considers her big sister in prison

In Argentina, 43% of inmates are serving a sentence for drug possession, according to the Ministry of Justice and Human Rights. It is, by far, the main cause of imprisonment for women in Argentina. By way of comparison, the second cause of imprisonment – theft – accounts for only 9% of convictions.

The pages of the detainee diary
The pages of the detainee diary

  • Pages from the detainee diary. Top left, “Today is very special for me because I became the mother of a boy who is now seven years old.” Top right, “I look forward to my freedom and to being with my family again, this time forever!” “

Getting out of the drug trap is difficult for women in poor neighborhoods. For many, drugs have been a lifelong presence in their lives from their early years. Nahir, 19, in prison in Buenos Aires, takes care of his dark hair and always keeps a long smile intact. She first tried cocaine when she was 15. Having a mother addicted to drugs was almost a natural thing to do. The powder was there on the bed, and she and her boyfriend casually tried it.

Maria, 20, talks to her cellmate Aldana, 20, who was separated due to an argument with another detainee

  • Maria, 20, talks to her cellmate Aldana, 20, who was separated due to an argument with another detainee

Nahir became entangled with drugs. She became addicted and, having no money, began to steal in order to buy more. One day, the police chased her through the narrow alleys of a slum when she was going to buy drugs. She escaped and hid in an abandoned house and fell asleep for an entire day. One week, she consumed 45 grams and stole 10,000 pesos. It could only end in two ways: a prison cell or a coffin. She was imprisoned. “Thank goodness,” she said. “I was taken. I lost the most precious thing: freedom; but I stopped using it and I’m still alive.

Nahir, 19, jailed for drug possession, is part of a group of inmates who inaugurated the young adult quarter of Unit 47

  • Nahir, 19, jailed for drug possession, is part of a group of inmates who inaugurated the young adult quarter of Unit 47

Selling drugs is a survival strategy for women in Latin America. They are the most visible – and the most exposed – face of drug trafficking in the region. They are also, in most cases, the product of their situation: violence, lack of education, poverty, asymmetric power relations and inequity.

Yamila, 22, sunbathes on the patio of her detention center

  • Above, Yamila, 22, is sunbathing on the patio of her detention center. On the right, the detainees in the courtyard in front of their cell to which they have access from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Prisoners in the courtyard outside their cells

Alejandro Corda, lawyer and criminal law researcher on drugs, declares: “We have a failed strategy, there is a criminal policy targeting petty traffickers, it is a usual practice which gives results by arresting as many as possible. . These petty traffickers are women, they are the weakest link in the chain, catching them does not require research or development. But these women are not the leaders in the drug trade.

Nahir, 19, plays rugby in Unit 47
Inmates play rugby in Unit 47
Inmates play rugby in Unit 47

The incarceration of women for drug-related offenses in the region has increased dramatically over the past two decades, and has increased at a much higher rate than the imprisonment of men, according to the Washington Office for Latin American Affairs.

Inmates study and share a moment inside their cells
Inmates watch television in their cells

  • Top left, inmates study and share a moment inside their cells. Top right, detainees watch television in their cells. Below, 22-year-old Yamila chats with her relatives in prison. Since the start of the pandemic, it is accepted that all detainees have a cell phone

Yamila, 22, talks to her relatives in prison.  Since the start of the pandemic, it is accepted that all detainees have a cell phone

Paola is currently serving a four-year sentence in Unit 47 prison in Buenos Aires. She is one of 22,000 women convicted of drug-related offenses. Inside the prison, Paola is an exemplary pupil, studying at primary school level. She does her homework, asks her companions for help when she doesn’t know something, cooks for the women in the ward, and helps her children at school over the phone. Paola doesn’t know what to do when she is released; she does not want to go back to prison but recognizes that drug trafficking is an easy and attractive alternative.


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CommonWealth Magazine https://pclunwen.com/commonwealth-magazine/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 13:26:55 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/commonwealth-magazine/ HISTORY IS HAPPENING crashing down with all the drama that turns the pages of a gripping work of fiction. An opening scene of the 15-year-old protagonist pointing a gun at his mother’s face. A rewind of the story to a stage where he was a 6 or 7 year old boy holding a brick menacingly […]]]>

HISTORY IS HAPPENING crashing down with all the drama that turns the pages of a gripping work of fiction.

An opening scene of the 15-year-old protagonist pointing a gun at his mother’s face. A rewind of the story to a stage where he was a 6 or 7 year old boy holding a brick menacingly over the head of another boy after he had first tied it to the leg with it. Years later, he’s a hardened street gamer, inflicting violence or the threat of it without a second thought, almost dying of a bullet in the neck, but only gets away with being sentenced to 15 years in federal prison, where he now spends days writing, trying to figure out who he is, a dangerous criminal who once gave himself the nickname “Death”.

Despite its literary character, the powerfully told story is not a novel, but a narrative journalistic article of over 8,000 words who made the Sunday headlines Boston Globe.

Long duration World criminal journalist Evan Allen explains in the article that this resulted from his quest to find an example of “what Boston police used to call “dynasty families” – families that seemed to pass violence as a legacy from generation to generation. ”

She found such a family – and a lot of material from which to begin assembling their story – through her correspondence with Anthony Pledger, a Boston native who shared her story with her through a constant exchange of letters from a cell in federal prison in California.

“Anthony’s great-uncle killed his best friend,” she writes. “Her mother went to jail for robbing a bank. Her father was a gang member and a drug dealer. Two of his brothers were serving life sentences for murder, another was murdered pending his gun trial, and a fourth was shot but survived. Anthony himself was a dangerous and brutal man just over half of a 15-year stint in federal prison.

Allen says she sought to answer a central question. “I wanted to know if this was inevitable,” she writes of Pledger’s life trajectory.

Pledger was not only gunned down as a young adult, but he was also abused as a child at the hands of a belt brandished by his mother – having run away at least once to escape to blows. But it is the pleasure he says he felt while visiting the pain of others that jumps out at the most frightening in history.

“Something amazing had happened to him over there on that end of the sidewalk, with the brick in the air and his eyes fixed on the terrified boy, ”Allen writes of meeting Pledger at the age of 6 or 7.

“It was the first time that I shared my pain and felt the soothing pleasure of inflicting it,” she wrote to him in one of her many letters. “The violence has become a breakdown,” Pledger said.

“What I find to inflict pain is company in my dark place,” Pledger wrote to him in another letter. “I needed the victims to feel what it feels like to hurt.”

Allen’s powerful essay unboxes the story of a Boston “dynasty” family, but it is also largely a story of our time. The level of trauma and chaos in Pledger’s life can be difficult for most to understand, but the idea of ​​exploring the past to understand some aspect of how someone is broken today has become the one. daily history of modern life.

This is the blow to contemporary fiction and cinema that literary critic Parul Sehgal offers in the latest issue of The New Yorker. In “The case against the trauma plot”, she writes that “the plot of trauma flattens, distorts, reduces the character to a symptom and, in turn, educates and emphasizes its moral authority.”

Sehgal suggests we are inundated with stories that find PTSD under every stone – or as the backstory of too many narrative offerings. “The invocation of trauma promises access to a well-guarded blood chamber; more and more, however, we feel like we’ve stepped into a rather generic motel room, with all the signs of heavy turnover, ”she wrote.

The idea of ​​traumatic memories is actually a relatively new idea, she explains, first expressed in the 1860s by a British physician who recounted reports of “confusion, hearing voices and paralysis” among women. victims of railway accidents who had not suffered any physical injuries. The idea reached a wider scope with the introduction of the idea of ​​being “shocked” by service during World War I. Fast forward to the present and stories of trauma are everywhere – from COVID report on schoolchildren at the lingering effects of the Capitol uprising a year later on those who lived it.

Stories of trauma seem to have become the literary piñata of the season. Sehgal’s essay follows an equally harsh assessment of Will Self in the December cover of Harper magazine“A posthumous shock: how it all became trauma.”

While awkward invocations of the global power of trauma can pervade modern culture, Allen’s essay hardly seems to conform to the generic denigration of Sehgal’s motel room.

Indeed, a central tension of his piece involves grappling with the question of how much of Pledger’s violence and cruelty resulted from having these things returned to him.

“Sometimes he seemed to consider the idea that life had drilled violence into him,” she wrote. “But in his replies to my long, in-depth letters, he kept coming back again and again to the idea that his sufferings, which were becoming more and more cruel and calculated from year to year, were not creations but revelations. , each returning a different coat. the truth of what it already was. “A birthmark,” he wrote to me. “

Allen breaks with journalistic conventions by bringing his own ‘birthmark’ story into the essay, courageously sharing his struggle with mental illness – and the long line of family members with such a history that points to a genetic predisposition. Most poignantly, she wonders what this might mean for her own young daughter.

Meet the author

Editor-in-chief, Commonwealth

On Michael jonas

Michael Jonas has worked in Massachusetts journalism since the early 1980s. Prior to joining the CommonWealth team in early 2001, he was an editor for the magazine for two years. Her cover story in the Fall 1999 issue of CommonWealth on Young Boston Outreach Workers was shortlisted for a PASS (Prevention for a Safer Society) award from the National Crime and Delinquency Council.

Michael made his journalism debut at Dorchester Community News, a community newspaper serving Boston’s largest neighborhood, where he covered a range of urban issues. Since the late 1980s, he has been a regular contributor to the Boston Globe. For 15 years he wrote a weekly column on local politics for the City Weekly section of the Boston Sunday Globe.

Michael has also worked in broadcast journalism. In 1989, he co-produced “The AIDS Quarterly,” a national PBS series produced by WGBH-TV in Boston, and in the early 1990s he worked as a producer for “Our Times,” a weekly magazine on WHDH- TV (Ch. 7) in Boston.

Michael lives in Dorchester with his wife and their two daughters.

On Michael jonas

Michael Jonas has worked in Massachusetts journalism since the early 1980s. Prior to joining the CommonWealth team in early 2001, he was an editor for the magazine for two years. Her cover story in the Fall 1999 issue of CommonWealth on Young Boston Outreach Workers was shortlisted for a PASS (Prevention for a Safer Society) award from the National Crime and Delinquency Council.

Michael made his journalism debut at Dorchester Community News, a community newspaper serving Boston’s largest neighborhood, where he covered a range of urban issues. Since the late 1980s, he has been a regular contributor to the Boston Globe. For 15 years he wrote a weekly column on local politics for the City Weekly section of the Boston Sunday Globe.

Michael has also worked in broadcast journalism. In 1989, he co-produced “The AIDS Quarterly,” a national PBS series produced by WGBH-TV in Boston, and in the early 1990s he worked as a producer for “Our Times,” a weekly magazine on WHDH- TV (Ch. 7) in Boston.

Michael lives in Dorchester with his wife and their two daughters.

Just as she shares her fervent hope that her daughter will not “inherit what I have done,” Allen desperately wants to believe that Pledger can find some version of redemption.

But unlike the quality of the trauma accounts Sehgal and Self so disparage, she seems resigned to the ambiguity of her story and the understanding that things don’t go in a straight line.

TO SHARE


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Pine River Girl Wins Patriot’s Pen Essay Contest https://pclunwen.com/pine-river-girl-wins-patriots-pen-essay-contest/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 15:11:01 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/pine-river-girl-wins-patriots-pen-essay-contest/ The theme was “How Can I Be a Good American?” “ The second was Soren Benson, Pillager, a grade eight student at Lake Region Christian School in Baxter, who won $ 150. In third place Annemarie Cady, Aitkin, an eighth grade student at St. Francis, who won $ 100. The winners move on to the […]]]>

The theme was “How Can I Be a Good American?” “

The second was Soren Benson, Pillager, a grade eight student at Lake Region Christian School in Baxter, who won $ 150. In third place Annemarie Cady, Aitkin, an eighth grade student at St. Francis, who won $ 100.

The winners move on to the district, state and national competition with $ 55,000 in scholarships.

A presentation ceremony took place at the Brainerd VFW.

The Bueckers first place essay is as follows:

How can I be a good American?

By Mimi Bueckers

America was founded on the belief that all human beings are created equal and that everyone has the right to freedoms. Some American ideals are democracy, freedom, opportunity, and equality. “Give me your tired, your poor, your crowded masses who yearn to breathe freely” is engraved on the Statue of Liberty. Americans are compassionate, helpful, caring, and want good for everyone. By using these American ideals of equality, service to others, and perseverance, I can be a good American.

I can treat others with respect and knowing that we are all created equally. I think sometimes Americans forget that we are all equal, which is one of the biggest problems in our country today. Too many Americans treat others rudely just because they look different, have a different skin color, believe in different things, or come from different backgrounds. I can be a good example for others by being respectful to everyone even if they are different.

“E Pluribus Unum” is America’s motto; it means “among many, one”. The United States is a nation of immigrants, of different races, languages, religions and traditions, but we are still united. I can be a good American by recognizing the differences of others while seeing them as a person and as an American.

I can be a good American by serving others. Volunteering is a great American value. Good Americans are always ready to help others without expecting to be paid. By volunteering and helping others freely, I can become a better American.

Americans have always shown persistence and a good attitude when it comes to getting things done. I can be a good American by continuing this tradition in my own life. There are times when I’m tired and I feel like I can’t do the task at hand, but if I put all my mind and heart into it, I know I can do it. Americans have the ideal that anything is possible and that is a wonderful thought to have. I can accomplish things with persistence and persistence.

Being a good American means having many good values. I can be a good American by using my values ​​and treating others with respect and equality, serving others in need, and showing persistence. America is a wonderful nation and I am happy to contribute to it by being a good American.


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Guest Essay: Learn from the 2021 Legislature’s Mistakes to Bring a Brighter 2022 | Letters https://pclunwen.com/guest-essay-learn-from-the-2021-legislatures-mistakes-to-bring-a-brighter-2022-letters/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 05:15:00 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/guest-essay-learn-from-the-2021-legislatures-mistakes-to-bring-a-brighter-2022-letters/ Last year was certainly one for the books, although the reasons 2021 was so remarkable aren’t necessarily worth celebrating. Our governor resigned in disgrace, more businesses we love in our communities closed, taxes rose, prices rose, and we passed a budget that cost us more than ever. While doing less than ever to really help […]]]>

Last year was certainly one for the books, although the reasons 2021 was so remarkable aren’t necessarily worth celebrating.

Our governor resigned in disgrace, more businesses we love in our communities closed, taxes rose, prices rose, and we passed a budget that cost us more than ever. While doing less than ever to really help working families. Throughout, we have also continued to face a pandemic that has rocked our economy and the courage of New Yorkers across the state, as some in government once again contemplate mandates and lockdowns that would certainly have a huge impact on our collective recovery.

I say this not to stir up feelings of doom, but out of hope that by recognizing the mistakes made by state government this year, we can work together to rectify them and put our state on the path to growth. The circumstances we face have often been described as “unprecedented”, so given the challenges we face, I believe we have the opportunity to work collaboratively to provide solutions that many Assembly members legislative have not really shaken in the past.

To put it simply, I believe the best way to foster prosperity here in New York State is to unleash the power of its people by staying away from their success. By creating a business climate that will attract our country’s brightest minds and retain the talents we have. More than anything, we need to give people a reason to believe that New York’s brightest days are yet to come.

Perhaps, more importantly, we also need to make sure that people feel safe living and having families here. To do this, we must give our law enforcement and our justice system the tools they need to protect our neighborhoods. Ending the decline of our towns, cities and towns will begin with the repeal of our dangerous state bond reform laws. These changes have tied the hands of our judges and allowed criminal elements to act with impunity, knowing that they will be released into the streets, even if they are apprehended. In 2022, we must collectively recognize that bail reform was wrong and restore law and order to all of New York City.

Here in New York, we have tried to raise taxes, we have tried heavy warrants, and we have tried various police “reforms”, all to the detriment of public safety and the prosperity of our state. If there has ever been a time for a change to give New Yorkers a chance to pursue their dreams and uplift their communities in the process, it is now. This year, let’s give New Yorkers a chance to control their own destiny, end universal mandates, and empower individuals and local governments to do what’s best for their families and the municipalities they know. and love.

New Yorkers are the toughest, most industrious people in the country, and they deserve a legal and economic climate that will allow them to unleash what they are capable of in the domestic and global marketplace. This year, let’s make New York City work for those who seek to improve their lives and their communities through hard work.

Assembly member Steve Hawley, R-Batavia, represents the 139th District, which is made up of the counties of Genesee, Orleans, and parts of Monroe County.


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LeBron James on Kareem Abdul-Jabbar’s COVID Trial https://pclunwen.com/lebron-james-on-kareem-abdul-jabbars-covid-trial/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 13:29:00 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/lebron-james-on-kareem-abdul-jabbars-covid-trial/ LeBron James had “no response at all” to Kareem Abdul-Jabbar after the NBA Hall of Fame wrote an essay claiming James dealt a “blow” to his “worthy legacy” after posting a controversial COVID-19 meme. James was asked about Abdul-Jabbar’s comments after dropping 32 points in a 132-123 win over the Rockets on Tuesday – a […]]]>

LeBron James had “no response at all” to Kareem Abdul-Jabbar after the NBA Hall of Fame wrote an essay claiming James dealt a “blow” to his “worthy legacy” after posting a controversial COVID-19 meme.

James was asked about Abdul-Jabbar’s comments after dropping 32 points in a 132-123 win over the Rockets on Tuesday – a day after the essay was published.

“No, I don’t have a response to Kareem at all,” he said, before offering a lengthy response explaining why he shared the meme.

Last weekend, James took to Instagram to share a cartoon image of three identical Spider-Man characters, showing each other with the words “COVID,” “Flu” and “Cold.” He captioned his post: “Help me people.”

“And if you’ve seen the post and read the tag, you know I’m literally and honestly asking, ‘help me’. Help me figure it all out, like we are all trying to figure out this pandemic, ”said James Tusday. “We are all trying to understand COVID and the new strain [omicron].

LeBron James in the Lakers’ win over the Rockets on December 28, 2021.
PA

“And the flu, I think people forgot about the flu. People literally like to forget about the flu during these times, as if it is still circulating. It’s flu season, so people forgot about the flu. People forgot about colds. It happens, especially with many of our children who are in school. My daughter [Zhuri James] is in grade one, so many of these kids get colds and the flu. But no, I have no answer to Kareem. No, at all, ”he continued.

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar has openly criticized James.
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar has openly criticized James.
NBAE / Getty Images

Abdul-Jabbar, who has been a vocal critic of anti-vaxxers, wrote a blog post on James, titled “Dear LeBron: Here is the COVID-19 Help You Asked for in Your Spider-Man Meme.

The Lakers legend described the meme as’ uninformed ‘and said,’ LeBron encouraged reluctance to vaccinate which puts lives and livelihoods at risk. “

James, who is vaccinated against COVID-19, said previously he “won’t talk about other people and what they should be doing” with regard to treatment for the virus.

Abdul-Jabbar has targeted James in a number of public messages citing concerns about vaccines and COVID-19.



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Fall River Students Can Win Amazon Gift Cards in MLK Jr. “Words with Martin” Essay & Art Contest – Fall River Reporter https://pclunwen.com/fall-river-students-can-win-amazon-gift-cards-in-mlk-jr-words-with-martin-essay-art-contest-fall-river-reporter/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 17:30:57 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/fall-river-students-can-win-amazon-gift-cards-in-mlk-jr-words-with-martin-essay-art-contest-fall-river-reporter/ (FALL RIVER, MA – December 27, 2021) – Mayor Paul Coogan, in partnership with the Fall River Diversity Committee, announced the MLK Jr. “Words with Martin” Essay and Art Competition. The competition is organized in partnership with Bristol Community College, which will highlight the work of the students during their annual MLK week. All Kindergarten […]]]>

(FALL RIVER, MA – December 27, 2021) – Mayor Paul Coogan, in partnership with the Fall River Diversity Committee, announced the MLK Jr. “Words with Martin” Essay and Art Competition.

The competition is organized in partnership with Bristol Community College, which will highlight the work of the students during their annual MLK week. All Kindergarten to Grade 12 students who live or attend school in Fall River are eligible to apply.

Students should enter a drawing or essay, depending on their age, that answers the following question: “If you were lucky enough to meet Martin Luther King Jr, what would you talk about?” The categories are:

 Primary school (grades K-5): Drawing or poster
 College (Grades 6-8) and High School (Grades 9-12): essay, poem, or audio (such as a podcast, spoken word, or song)

Registrations are due before January 12th. Assignments can be submitted through the student’s school or by using the drop box at Town Hall. Submissions should include the student’s name, grade, and school, as well as the name and phone number of a parent / guardian.

Amazon gift cards will be awarded as prizes for the 1st ($ 100), 2nd ($ 75) and 3rd ($ 50) winners in each age category.

For more details, visit the Facebook page at https://fb.me/e/10b5TP9oT or contact Mayor Coogan’s office at 508-324-2600.


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