Literature – PC Lunwen http://pclunwen.com/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 23:01:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://pclunwen.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/favicon.png Literature – PC Lunwen http://pclunwen.com/ 32 32 Frieda Ekotto ’86 – Colorado College https://pclunwen.com/frieda-ekotto-86-colorado-college/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 23:01:25 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/frieda-ekotto-86-colorado-college/ “I met two professors from here, Marcelle Rabbi and Harvey Rabbi… Every time I receive an award or receive a promotion, I think of the first day I met those two, and I Think about the first day I landed on this campus. I mean, Colorado College really changed my life. And I don’t think […]]]>

“I met two professors from here, Marcelle Rabbi and Harvey Rabbi… Every time I receive an award or receive a promotion, I think of the first day I met those two, and I Think about the first day I landed on this campus. I mean, Colorado College really changed my life. And I don’t think I’d be here today without those two professors who thought I could be somebody. a.

– Frieda Ekotto ’86

Frieda Ekotto ’86 was the first African woman to graduate from Colorado College. She is an intellectual force in French and Francophone studies; a renowned novelist; and literary criticism. She directs the Department of African American and African Studies at the University of Michigan, and she speaks and has published in four different languages. But it has not always been so.

Ekotto, who was born in Cameroon and raised in Switzerland, was a global citizen in her late teens. She moved from Europe to the United States to attend high school as a non-traditional student, where she wanted to learn English. But her studies were not going well and she felt lost. Then, while she was skiing, she met two CC professors – Harvey and Marcelle Rabbi – who asked her to apply to Colorado College. They helped her apply for a scholarship, and Ekotto enrolled in classes in 1983.

Ekotto grew up surrounded by books, art and music, which were all the tools she needed to express herself. But when she started her career at CC, she faced a deep and constant challenge: to learn English fast enough to keep up with her classes. She says it was Harvey and Marcelle who helped keep her on track. The rabbis take her under their wing, treating her like a carrier girl. Marcelle, who was born in France, taught Ekotto in French and English. When Ekotto was overwhelmed, she walked to their house on the street and knocked on the door. They walked the dog together or had dinner. The rabbis were lifesavers, making sure she was cared for every day. Above all, Harvey pointed out, was Ekotto’s need to discover her voice: to find the language to speak for herself.

After graduating in 1986, Ekotto earned a doctorate. in French and Comparative Literature from the University of Minnesota. She then began teaching in 1994 at the University of Michigan. Throughout a storied career spanning academic and creative work, she never left college. In 2014, she became the first African woman to head the Department of African American and African Studies and was awarded a collegiate professorship, one of the highest academic honors awarded by the university.

His academic and fictional writings are indelibly shaped by his upbringing. Ekotto’s scholarly work examines issues of race and inequality, as well as film and literature in the French-speaking world. Many of Ekotto’s novels focus on gender and sexuality in sub-Saharan Africa. Language, identity and expression are the guidelines of his work. Whether in fictional or academic writing, Ekotto says she is fascinated by the power language has to confine or liberate how a person can express themselves through language or be denied that expression.

Harvey and Marcelle retired to France and Ekotto stayed in touch with them, often walking around Paris with Harvey as they discussed his career. His mentorship also left an indelible mark on his life. Today, as she teaches students, Ekotto passes on Harvey’s most important lesson. She asks them to find their own voice: their contribution to the discourse and their unique ability to create a better and more peaceful world.

In 2023, Ekotto will embark on a new adventure. She will become president of the Modern Language Association of America, a leading advocate for strengthening the study and teaching of languages ​​and literature, where she will serve a one-year term. She continues to travel, settling around the world and offering the same mentorship that Harvey Rabbi gave her to her students.

Above all, Ekotto says she hopes to give back to Colorado College, the institution that shaped her — which taught her courage, humility and how to speak her own truth to the world, in whatever language she speaks. ‘she chooses.

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Neev Literature Festival 2022 – The Hindu https://pclunwen.com/neev-literature-festival-2022-the-hindu/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 13:36:00 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/neev-literature-festival-2022-the-hindu/ The festival will be held at Neev Academy Campus, Bengaluru on September 24-25 The festival will be held at Neev Academy Campus, Bengaluru on September 24-25 The directory Neev Literature Festival (NLF), which celebrates children’s books, will be back physically after being online for the past two years due to the pandemic. The Bangalore Festival […]]]>

The festival will be held at Neev Academy Campus, Bengaluru on September 24-25

The festival will be held at Neev Academy Campus, Bengaluru on September 24-25

The directory Neev Literature Festival (NLF), which celebrates children’s books, will be back physically after being online for the past two years due to the pandemic. The Bangalore Festival will be held at Neev Academy Campus, Yemalur on September 24-25.

According to organizers, this year’s festival theme, “Reading Takes You”, emphasizes the power of books to allow you to discover new places – real and imagined – and explore diverse cultural perspectives.

The festival will host a myriad of events with renowned authors, librarians, award-winning filmmakers and storytellers discussing and interacting with the public on a plethora of topics. It offers over 92 sessions with over 60 speakers enlightening young minds on topics ranging from climate change to conflict zone writing.

Roopa Pai, Anushka Ravishankar, Paro Anand, Jane De Suza, Samina Mishra, Venita Coelho, Shabnam Minawalla, Sandhya Rao, Bijal Vaccharajani, Arundhati Venkatesh and Menaka Raman are among the speakers.

Attendees can also check out an organized book market for readers of all ages.

The festival will also release a report, “State of Indian Children’s Writing”, which explains how small the children’s book market is and is dominated by Western titles. “The profession of children’s writing must also become more financially viable in India,” says Kavita Gupta Sabharwal, co-founder and curator of the festival.

“The Neev Literature Festival, in its sixth edition, aims to evangelize the power of reading for lifelong learning and the power of Indian stories for the construction of identity,” she adds, “With changing family structures and the constant digital invasion, children’s books are now the literary benchmark. Mirrors and windows to everyone’s possibilities. Indian books, on the other hand, focus on the personal timeline , mythology and folk tales are wonderful, but should also convey the Ideas of India@75 and the hopes of India@100.

On the first day, the Neev Book Award jury members will announce the winners in the four categories: Early Years (5-7 years old), Emerging Readers (6-8 years old), Junior Readers (9-12 years old), and Young Adult. (13-18 years old).

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Book Review: Star Wars: Death Troopers – Quick Literature Review https://pclunwen.com/book-review-star-wars-death-troopers-quick-literature-review/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 20:30:33 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/book-review-star-wars-death-troopers-quick-literature-review/ Star Wars: Death Troopers When the imperial prison barge Purge—temporarily housing five hundred of the galaxy’s most ruthless killers, rebels, villains, and thieves—breaks down in a remote, uninhabited part of space, its only hope seems to lie in a Star Destroyer found adrift, abandoned, and apparently derelict. But when a boarding party is sent to […]]]>

Star Wars: Death Troopers

When the imperial prison barge Purge—temporarily housing five hundred of the galaxy’s most ruthless killers, rebels, villains, and thieves—breaks down in a remote, uninhabited part of space, its only hope seems to lie in a Star Destroyer found adrift, abandoned, and apparently derelict. But when a boarding party is sent to collect parts, only half of them return – bringing with them a horrific disease so deadly that within hours nearly everyone aboard the Purge will die in some way. too hideous to imagine.

And death is just the beginning.

The half-dozen survivors of the Purge – two teenage brothers, a sadistic captain of the guards, a couple of rogue smugglers, and the chief medical officer, the lone woman on board – will do whatever it takes to stay alive. But nothing can prepare them for what awaits them aboard the Star Destroyer amid its vast, creaking void that isn’t really empty at all. For the dead rise, soulless, unstoppable and indescribably hungry.

Author: Joe Schreiber
Cover artist: Toula Lotay
Editor: Del Rey
Release date: August 2, 2022
Pages: 265
ISBN: 0345509625

What is it about ?

The younger brothers, Trig and Kale Longo, are being held aboard the houseboat The Purge. Zahara Cody is the prison doctor, both despised and coveted. Captain Sartoris is the head of the prison guards and has more than one skeleton in his closet.

Should I read this book?

If you are a horror fan, star wars and thrill rides, then you should definitely read this book. Make no mistake; it’s a zombie story. It’s full of the familiar tropes and touchstones of the subgenre and its star wars the setting doesn’t dilute the dread, gore, and tension you’d expect.

I’m a big fan of authors taking influence from different genres within a shared universe, and this is a far more successful example of star wars horror than anything that preceded or followed it.

If you can’t stop reading star wars but you want a break from the more traditional tales of Jedi and villains, then this might just be the palate cleanser you’ve been looking for. It is also the perfect star wars book to read before Halloween.

What did you like?

Once the story started, I had a hard time letting go. It’s a boundless firecracker of a book that will stick with you long after you finish it. The characters were well made and easy to connect, urging you to survive them and dread their demise. It’s a small thing but it’s huge for star wars readers. We rarely follow characters whose destiny we do not know before entering them. There are real stakes here and I found myself hesitantly turning each page, one eye closed, afraid to reveal the end of one of my protagonists.

I also liked the idea of ​​a star wars story set in a prison. There are a lot of interesting stories that could be told in this setting and it amazes me that we haven’t had much more than a few comic arcs and this one book. I would take a whole series set on a prison barge with or without the zombies. The book sets up its own mysteries and drama even before the virus is discovered and they are largely crushed when the real “meat” of the story kicks in. You’d think that would be a negative, but it doesn’t. recalled the intentional error found in From Dusk ‘Til Dawn and it only adds potency to the chaos and violence when the story really kicks off.

What didn’t you like?

It would be irresponsible of me not to issue some sort of warning. There are scenes in this book that are really hard to take. They’re typical of the zombie genre but it’s incredibly disarming to encounter moments like these in a star wars book. There’s one particular scene about a third into the book that made me put the book down and pull myself together before continuing my dark journey. It’s by no means negative, but I’ve spoken to a few people who found they couldn’t continue reading when they reached those chapters. So take that as a warning to bring your big boy/girl pants when reading this book.

And after?

There is a prequel to this book which is set during the Old Republic and is called red harvest. I haven’t read it yet, but I heard it’s better to read after soldiers of death. As star wars fans, we’re more than used to experiencing prequels after the original material, so I can’t wait to read this one.

Also in canon is George Mann’s collection of horror-inspired short stories, Dark Legends, which would make sense to pick up if you’re feeling that darker side of the galaxy far and wide.

Anything else to add?

There are a few cameos in this book that some might say are unnecessary and I can see why, especially since there’s no way this character will be the same after the events of soldiers of death and we have already encountered them after these events in the Legends timeline. I will say though that the characterization was spot on so that didn’t bother me too much.

Sale

Death Troopers: Star Wars Legends

  • Schreiber, Joe (Author)
  • English (language of publication)
  • 288 Pages – 02/08/2022 (Publish date) – Random House Worlds (Publisher)
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Saratoga Community Briefings for the week of September 23 – The Mercury News https://pclunwen.com/saratoga-community-briefings-for-the-week-of-september-23-the-mercury-news/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 14:31:40 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/saratoga-community-briefings-for-the-week-of-september-23-the-mercury-news/ Sala-Festival The South Asian Literature and Art Festival (SALA) returns to the Montalvo Arts Center on October 29 and 30, with panels and conversations that examine and celebrate a wide variety of viewpoints around a certain theme. This year’s event, presented by ArtForum SF, focuses on a theme of “Humanity” examining how the world tends […]]]>

Sala-Festival

The South Asian Literature and Art Festival (SALA) returns to the Montalvo Arts Center on October 29 and 30, with panels and conversations that examine and celebrate a wide variety of viewpoints around a certain theme.

This year’s event, presented by ArtForum SF, focuses on a theme of “Humanity” examining how the world tends to box people, categorizing and generalizing communities of color, class, gender and different castes. The public can participate in discussions with authors of South Asian origin, some of whom will sell and sign their books

The festival also features a market, craft activities for children, dance, music, poetry and painting. Food will be available for purchase and a bar will offer beer, wine and soda.

The festival runs from noon to 6:30 p.m. both days at Montalvo, 15400 Montalvo Road, Saratoga. Single-day tickets are $30 and weekend passes are $50 at https://montalvoarts.org/experience/community-events/sala.

Supers get fired

The Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors took action Sept. 13 to bolster fire prevention and mitigation efforts.

The council asked county staff to identify funds needed to: develop and implement aerial fire detection using drones; refresher training for Central County Fire District personnel; and pursue opportunities to scale up fuel reduction efforts in the county.

In April, the council directed the district to expand its pre-fire management and wildfire resilience program, including the addition of a dedicated fuel crew to clear brush and vegetation along the escape routes and roads to reduce the ignition and spread of forest fires.

District boundaries include Cupertino, Los Gatos, Monte Sereno, and part of Saratoga and unincorporated lands in western Santa Clara County, an area largely contained within Supervisor Joseph Simitian’s District 5.

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Walter Dean Myers Award for Outstanding Children’s Literature 2023 https://pclunwen.com/walter-dean-myers-award-for-outstanding-childrens-literature-2023/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 12:30:29 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/walter-dean-myers-award-for-outstanding-childrens-literature-2023/ Deadline: November 15, 2022 Nominations are open for the 2023 Walter Dean Myers Awards for Outstanding Children’s Literature. The awards recognize diverse authors whose works feature diverse lead characters and address diversity in meaningful ways. Myers was the third National Ambassador for Children’s Literature, appointed in 2012 by the Library of Congress. He was a […]]]>


Deadline: November 15, 2022

Nominations are open for the 2023 Walter Dean Myers Awards for Outstanding Children’s Literature. The awards recognize diverse authors whose works feature diverse lead characters and address diversity in meaningful ways.

Myers was the third National Ambassador for Children’s Literature, appointed in 2012 by the Library of Congress. He was a champion of diversity in children’s books. The Walter Awards commemorate the memory and memory of Myers. its literary heritage, as well as celebrating diversity in children’s literature.

Categories

  • The 2023 Walter Prizes will be awarded in two categories: teens and young readers.

Eligibility

  • A submission must be written by a diverse author and the submission must be a diverse work. If a work has co-authors, at least one of the authors must be diverse.
  • A diverse work is a work written by a diverse author featuring a diverse main character. For works without a main character, the work must address diversity in a substantial way.
  • The work must be an original work first published in English in 2022 and must be readily available in the United States, either from a US publisher or a US distributor.
  • The work may have originally been in another language and translated, but the earliest English publication date must be in 2022. Multilingual editions are also eligible as long as the primary language is English.
  • For teenagers, the work must be determined as being intended for an audience between the ages of 13 and 18.
  • For consideration of young readers, work should be determined to be intended for an audience of 9-13 years old. This category includes picture books whose format and content are deemed appropriate for this age group.

Application

The deadline for submitting nominations for the 2023 Walter Dean Myers Awards is November 15, 2022. All submissions must be postmarked no later than November 15, 2022. Submissions postmarked after this date will not may NOT be considered.

Publishers are invited to submit eligible titles for review by the Walter Awards Judging Committee. A physical book must be provided to each committee member. Contact [email protected] receive the delivery addresses of the members of the Committee.

When publishers submit books, they must provide information about the book[s] they send. The information requested includes:

  • A count of the books included in the shipment, with the publication dates for each book.
  • The diversity with which the author identifies.
  • The diversity of the main character or the overall diversity of the work.

Publishers must submit physical copies. Physical copies can be a finished book or an ARC. All ARCs must be followed by a final printed copy by December 31, 2022.

For more information, visit Walter Dean Myers Award.

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Poet, educator and freedom fighter who left her mark on Indian literature https://pclunwen.com/poet-educator-and-freedom-fighter-who-left-her-mark-on-indian-literature/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 04:37:25 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/poet-educator-and-freedom-fighter-who-left-her-mark-on-indian-literature/ Mahadevi Varma, often referred to as the “Meera” of the modern world, was a poet, essayist, educator and freedom fighter. She is considered one of the pillars of the Chhayawadi era in Hindi literature. After witnessing India before and after independence, she transformed into a poet who worked for the wider society of the country. […]]]>

Mahadevi Varma, often referred to as the “Meera” of the modern world, was a poet, essayist, educator and freedom fighter. She is considered one of the pillars of the Chhayawadi era in Hindi literature. After witnessing India before and after independence, she transformed into a poet who worked for the wider society of the country.

Significantly, his novel Deepshikha influenced much of society. Not only her poetry and essays, but her social uplift initiatives and her work in developing the welfare of women have also been appreciated. His remarks on colonial rule often sparked the idea of ​​independence, inspiring millions.

Early life of Mahadevi Varma

She was born on March 26, 1907 to a Hindu Chitraguptavanshi Kayastha family in Farrukhabad, Uttar Pradesh. Mahadevi’s father, Govind Prasad Varma, was a college teacher in Bhagalpur, and his mother, Hem Rani Devi, was a religious woman with immense interest in music.

Varma was admitted to a convent school, but due to her reluctant attitude, she was admitted to Crosthwaite Girls College in Allahabad. While studying there, she learned about the idea of ​​unity as students of different religions lived in the hostel. She used to write poems and essays in secret, but her roommate once exhibited her writings in front of everyone.

She and her friend, Subhadra, used to write and practice creative things by sitting under a tree at school while others played games on the ground. They both wrote several poems and managed to get a few published in a weekly magazine. The partnership continued until Subhadra graduated from Crosthwaite.

In a childhood biography, ‘My Childhood Days’, Varma noted that she was lucky to be born into a liberal family when a daughter was considered a burden on the family. However, by the standards, she married at age nine. For many years, Varma was married, but she chose to live an ascetic life, suggests Wikipedia.

The beginning of his career

She started her career as a teacher and became the principal of Prayag Mahila Vidyapeeth. She has greatly contributed to the development of the school. Her steps were considered revolutionary for the education of women during this period.

In 1923, she started writing for the leading women’s magazine “Chand”. Under the influence of Mahatama Gandhi, she entered the civil service and worked effortlessly in Jhansi alongside the freedom struggle. During her time as a poet, she published Nihar in 1930, Rashmi in 1933, Sandhyageet in 1939 and several other publications.

During the 1940s, she built her house in Umagarh village in Uttarakhand and named it Meera Temple. Until she lived in the city, all her time was devoted to the education and development of women. In present times, the house is known as the Sahitya Museum.

Also Read: From the Kollur Mine to the Tower of London: A Look Back at Kohinoor’s Voyage to India Captured by the British in 1849

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The Church Times Faith and Literature Festival moves to Winchester. Tickets on sale now https://pclunwen.com/the-church-times-faith-and-literature-festival-moves-to-winchester-tickets-on-sale-now/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 23:11:00 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/the-church-times-faith-and-literature-festival-moves-to-winchester-tickets-on-sale-now/ TICKETS are on sale for the next Church hours Festival of Faith and Literaturethe Festival’s first in-person gathering since February 2020. The Festival – which has continued during the pandemic with a series of one-day online events – will be held from February 24-26, 2023. After many years in the village of Bloxham, Oxfordshire, its […]]]>

TICKETS are on sale for the next Church hours Festival of Faith and Literaturethe Festival’s first in-person gathering since February 2020.

The Festival – which has continued during the pandemic with a series of one-day online events – will be held from February 24-26, 2023. After many years in the village of Bloxham, Oxfordshire, its new home is the city of Winchester. Events will take place at the University of Winchester, Winchester Cathedral and St John’s Parish Church.

The program — themed “Mapping the Landscape” — will consist of its usual mix of lectures, discussions and performances. The event opens on Friday evening in the cathedral, when the Archbishop of York will talk about his new book for Lent, Palm.

New to the Festival will be the inaugural Sir Tony Baldry Lecture, named after the Festival’s founder, former MP and Second Church Estates Commissioner. The 2023 lecture, ‘Ethics and Solidarity: A Basis for Christian Politics’, will be given by former Archbishop of Canterbury Lord Williams.

Other speakers on Saturday include Reverend Dr Sam Wells, Canon Mark Oakley, Bishop of Chelmsford, Dr Guli Francis-Dehqani, Reverend Azariah France-Williams and Dr Renie Choy. Historian Sir Anthony Seldon will talk about The Path of Peace: his book on a pilgrimage on the Western Front Way.

Novelists Francis Spufford, Catherine Fox and Jo Browning Wroe will talk about their work, and poetry will be provided by Canon Rachel Mann and Jay Hulme. On Saturday evening, the five parties, all female a cappella The group Papagena will give a concert in St John’s.

Television historian Professor Suzannah Lipscomb will return to the Festival on Sunday, when she speaks about the spiritual legacy of Mary I, in Winchester Cathedral – the place where Queen Tudor married Philip of Spain in 1554. After an evening of the festival, author James Runcie will be in conversation with tenor James Gilchrist — famous for his performances as the Evangelist in JS Bach’s Passion according to Saint Matthew — about his Bach novel, The great passion.

Tickets can be reserved on the faith and literature website, or by telephone on 01603 785925 (Monday to Friday 9am to 4.30pm). Early bird offers are available.

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The Dangers of Neglecting Critical Thinking When Reading Literature https://pclunwen.com/the-dangers-of-neglecting-critical-thinking-when-reading-literature/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 03:35:02 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/the-dangers-of-neglecting-critical-thinking-when-reading-literature/ Reading is fundamental. Photo by Lauren Hough. SADIA KHATRI | OPINION COLUMNIST | sskhatri@butler.edu Are the really blue curtains, and does it even matter? The current trend of rejecting nuanced interpretations of literature, especially literature that contains questionable themes by today’s standards, has been hugely popular on social media – ICT Tac in particular – […]]]>

Reading is fundamental. Photo by Lauren Hough.

SADIA KHATRI | OPINION COLUMNIST | sskhatri@butler.edu

Are the really blue curtains, and does it even matter? The current trend of rejecting nuanced interpretations of literature, especially literature that contains questionable themes by today’s standards, has been hugely popular on social media – ICT Tac in particular – and this must stop.

Critical mind is defined as the ability to analyze, conceptualize and reflect on a body of work. To think critically talking about a work means focusing on the possible interpretations of this work. The analysis of the literature is an important step to fully understand and appreciate all that one can read. Reading through a critical lens is especially important for older historical texts. Whether the literature you read is done in class or not, it’s important to think about the depth of meaning that each piece of literature contains.

English lecturer Dr. Angela Hofstetter described critical thinking as a process that involves intense focus.

“I think critical thinking involves serious focus and the ability to look at any problem from multiple angles,” Hofstetter said. “It allows you to… see how many ways [something] can be interpreted. »

Although critical thinking should be applied when engaging with literature, this is not the only situation in which it should be used. Being able to think critically is an important skill to have. It allows us to look at the world through a deeper lens. For example, at a time when disinformation is very common, critical thinking can prevent engaging with false information.

Dr. Joseph Long, Assistant Instructor of Philosophy, emphasized the importance of critical thinking as something everyone needs.

“[Critical thinking is] necessary for all of us to make good choices,” Long said. “When we are engaged in a dialogue…we are truly engaged in a cooperative exercise in which we work together towards the same goal, which is the resolution of the argument by finding the truth.”

Thinking critically about what we see and experience helps us better understand both the world around us and ourselves. It is necessary to have the skills to think critically about any subject matter, but this skill is particularly important when it comes to literature. Written texts contain a wealth of nuanced material waiting to be analyzed.

Hofstetter emphasized how critical it is to engage with literature through the lens of critical thinking. For her, nuance and critical thinking are necessary factors in successfully appreciating and analyzing literature.

“Literature can do a lot for critical thinking,” Hofstetter said. “Sometimes when we read an essay… the concepts can become abstract. And literature epitomizes the messiness of what it means to be human… As soon as you think you can cling to one person’s point of view, you’re shown another [view], and we get competing claims of ‘What is right? What’s good?’ Sometimes, and that’s really valuable.

A somewhat popular claim that has been made on social media is that older literary texts contain problematic themes – such as racism, sexism and other harmful beliefs – and therefore should not be engaged or read. Asked about the potentially problematic nature of older classic novels, Hofstetter provided some interesting insights.

“Of course they do. [contain such material]”, Hofstetter said. “People change over time, and what we do with them can be problematic, or it can be part of a larger conversation trying to understand the human condition… and where from. we come.”

When engaging with a text containing questionable themes, it is essential to think about it from a critical – and often historical – perspective. It is indisputable that racism, sexism, misogyny and other forms of hatred and prejudice are terrible, but it is important not to overlook the larger contexts of these texts in order to better understand why these sectarian beliefs existed in such proliferation. By not acknowledging the existence of such beliefs, history is ignored. Acknowledging history and historical texts is especially important in the current socio-political climate, given efforts to ban and censor texts have increased considerably. Literature that relates to issues of race, sexuality and gender is an especially popular choice for censorship. Neglecting to accept novels that, for example, accurately portray the horrors of history censors the experiences of people who have suffered. A refusal to recognize important parts of history sets us up for failure; we are bound to repeat our terrible mistakes if we fail to recognize them and learn from them.

In a follow-up email, Hofstetter also raised an important question about the subjectivity of what is defined as problematic. She pointed out that it is quite possible for a text or an author to symbolize several things. An example she provided was Jane Austen. One argument that has been made is that Austen’s work is symbolic of imperialism and whitenesswhile another argument that has been made is that his work is representative of freedom, choice and feminism. Both of these arguments may be true simultaneously. By thinking critically about Austen and her works, one is able to analyze these viewpoints to better understand Austen and the society of which she was the product.

It is quite possible for a piece of literature to contain themes worthy of analysis and content that is problematic or questionable by today’s standards. Arguably, most classic novels follow this trend, as they are products of their time. The forms of prejudice and bigotry evident in these novels should not be ignored or overlooked, and when Hofstetter was asked how to properly navigate these themes and content, she pointed out the complexity of such navigation.

There is no real answer or method on how to engage with historical literature that may contain problematic themes. However, critical thinking and nuance should always be applied. Understanding the depth of a work of literature allows us to understand why these questionable themes may have existed in the first place.

“It also sometimes helps us understand how someone came to see the world that way,” Hofstetter said. “Feeling with a character like that – even if it’s a problematic character – it can help…teach us something. And it can [potentially] help us learn how to change the world not to shape a character that way.

By analyzing the literature, we develop a better understanding of the world of yesterday and today. As Hofstetter mentioned, focusing and deeply analyzing a literary work that may have questionable content can provide us with valuable insight into why a character in a novel may have been characterized as he was. Additionally, the assertion that all older novels contain some form of bigotry or bias grossly undermines the achievements of marginalized authors.

Sophomore creative writing major Miranda Emerick had a similar belief in the importance of engaging with literature that may contain difficult-to-read themes.

“We can learn a lot about how not to be like that,” Emerick said. “You can take a look at a text…and sometimes…it can really change your view of the world because you’re like, ‘Oh, I didn’t even know people could think like that.'”

Emerick’s point is absolutely true. Reading something that contains elements you may not agree with can help you understand the full extent of the harmful nature of this type of belief. We are able to learn more about something that we may not have known much about before. Emerick also pointed out that books with difficult material should be read analytically.

“I think it’s important to look at these plays and look at them critically,” Emerick said. “Especially books with heavy themes of sexual violence and racism…it’s important to look at them and think about what we can take from them and what we need to do to grow as people.”

While living in a fast-paced and ever-changing world, it is essential to take a moment and think deeply about the literature we read. The sad truth is that many influential novels contain problematic themes. However, it is irresponsible to ignore these texts because of such themes. It is extremely important to analyze these themes and reflect on them with nuance in order to better understand why they are problematic. Taking problematic things at their problematic face values ​​benefits no one. When we truly engage with a text on a deeper level, we can learn something profound about the world.

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The first Authors Guild WIT festival comes to Shakespeare & Company https://pclunwen.com/the-first-authors-guild-wit-festival-comes-to-shakespeare-company/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 20:03:00 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/the-first-authors-guild-wit-festival-comes-to-shakespeare-company/ Lenox — The summer rush is over. Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony has closed the Tanglewood season, the kids are back in school and the Josh Billings RunAground is fast approaching. Hot on the heels of this event, at the end of September, the country’s oldest and greatest supporter of literature will help prolong the region’s cultural […]]]>

Lenox — The summer rush is over. Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony has closed the Tanglewood season, the kids are back in school and the Josh Billings RunAground is fast approaching.

Hot on the heels of this event, at the end of September, the country’s oldest and greatest supporter of literature will help prolong the region’s cultural festivities with a new addition to the slate. The Words, Ideas and Thinkers (WIT) Festival of the Authors Guild Foundation will take place from Thursday, September 22 to Sunday, September 25, at Shakespeare and Company, and other selected venues. Tickets for all but a few fundraising events will be offered free of charge.

WIT aims to “expand our understanding of critical issues, celebrate American literary culture, and amplify new voices and perspectives. According to Lynn Boulger, executive director of the Authors Guild Foundation and organizer of WIT, “barrier-free” accessibility was a top priority.

The theme for this inaugural year is “Reinventing America”. The festival’s panels, conversations and presentations will address, among other topics, climate change, a re-examination of American history and the role of fiction in American life, with speakers including best-selling writers and public intellectuals such as Dan Brown, author of “The Da Vinci Code” with authors Henry Louis Gates, Geraldine Brooks and Elizabeth Kolbert.

How did a New York-based national literary organization end up in Berkshire County? Boulger explained the genesis of WIT: “I had already organized a festival of ideas at my old job at Atlantic College. The Authors Guild Foundation said, “Oh my God, can you do this for us?” The mission of the foundation is to help promote literary culture in the United States. We thought of interesting places with a lot of charm and infrastructure that have a population that appreciates literature. Lenox seems like the perfect place.

The Foundation is the charitable arm of the Authors Guild, which since 1912 has supported the ability of writers to make a living from their work. It’s a mandate that has become much more critical over the past two decades as online publishing has exploded and made free content widely available. According to data from the Guild’s internal survey, authors’ incomes have fallen by 40% over the past 15 years.

The threads of the Guild’s work that touch on copyright protection, First Amendment defense and book ban offense, which have become a disturbing trend in recent years, are also imperative in this particularly difficult time.
The organization’s website also features extensive educational programming that aims to demystify the business side of life as a writer, with series of recorded and live webinars offered regularly on topics such as The Path to publication, Find your agent and The acquisition process.

Authors Guild President Douglas Preston is the author, along with Lincoln Child, of the Agent Pendergast series of thrillers and numerous other novels. He sees literature as a bulwark against a range of less nurturing cultural forces, and he sees the Guild as playing a key role in this work. “We’re the only writers’ group to have a full-time lobbyist in Washington,” he said, “and instead of lobbying for drug prices or oil leases, we’re lobbying for culture. American literature, which is a good thing. We are currently facing many challenges. Their educational webinar series, according to Preston, is a way to amplify the voices of writers from underrepresented communities. “We’ve been working hard trying to develop programs for them because there are a lot of wonderful writers out there, but they don’t know anything about how publishing works.”

For her role in the WIT Festival, Preston will interview climate writer Elizabeth Kolbert, author of, among other books, The Sixth Extinction and Field Notes From A Catastrophe, and New York contributor. He is very happy with the line-up, and Kolbert’s participation in particular. “She’s a terrific writer and such an important voice right now. We’re so glad she’s coming.

Thanks to Boulger’s extensive outreach and publicity work over the past year, news of the WIT festival has made the rounds of the Berkshires, and already many of the most popular sessions are sold out. (Henry Louis Gates’ conversation with David W. Blight, on Reexamining American History, was the first to sell out.) But, says Boulger, there are still plenty of tickets available, including for the weekend’s final conversation. -end, between Ayad Aktar and Susan Choi, on identity and belonging, as well as a special Saturday afternoon performance of Wild Symphony, Dan Brown’s newest is a children’s book, and the reading will be accompanied by the Pioneer Valley Symphony Orchestra. The book would appear to be a creative departure for Brown, whose world-famous 2003 thriller sold 80,000,000 copies. “The conductor [of Wild Symphony] is a mouse,” says Boulger, “and on each page they feature an animal playing an instrument. Not only did Dan write these rhyming coupling pages, but he also wrote a score to go with it.

Additionally, paid tickets are still available for four special meals and shows, with ticket prices ranging from $100 to $250, and funds raised support the work of the Foundation. “A Play, a Pint and a Picnic,” on the morning of September 25 on the lawn of The Mount, will feature a short comedy play by writer and playwright Laura Pederson, President of the Foundation. Tickets for this event are $150 and of course include the play, a pint and a picnic.

With a background in theater, Hunter Runnette, a member of the Authors Guild Foundation and Lenox resident, is one of the reasons the city will host the festival, though it wasn’t always the most natural choice. “I think Lynn was concerned that we were being taken advantage of, from a non-profit perspective, but it seemed like everyone wanted something like this to happen here.” Berkshire County is home to over 1,200 nonprofit organizations.

Runnette particularly appreciates the potential of WIT to realize a great idea from different angles. He is very interested in playwrights, which is why Ayad Aktar’s conversation with Susan Choi is high on his list of sessions he must attend. “I think Ayad is a fantastic playwright, and the concepts he explores are very relevant today.” Runnette also points to the festival’s opportunity for reflection, a precious commodity amid today’s often overwhelming information bombardment that seems to demand our attention and response. “Our world talks too much and doesn’t listen.”

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Contribution of Muslim Writers to Punjabi Literature in Jammu and Kashmir https://pclunwen.com/contribution-of-muslim-writers-to-punjabi-literature-in-jammu-and-kashmir/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 20:43:18 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/contribution-of-muslim-writers-to-punjabi-literature-in-jammu-and-kashmir/ posted on Sep 03, 2022 | Author DR. JASBIR SINGH SARNA PART 1 Jammu and Kashmir is the embodiment of Punjabi civilization and not the name of a mountainous region surrounded by fixed borders. It is the misfortune of the Punjabis that this place has been geographically isolated for political reasons. Jhelum, Chenab and Ravi […]]]>

posted on Sep 03, 2022 | Author DR. JASBIR SINGH SARNA

PART 1

Jammu and Kashmir is the embodiment of Punjabi civilization and not the name of a mountainous region surrounded by fixed borders. It is the misfortune of the Punjabis that this place has been geographically isolated for political reasons. Jhelum, Chenab and Ravi rivers, one of the five main symbols of the Punjabi civilization, embrace the fixed borders and sing the Punjabi tune in the mural region. Punjabi language is one of the vital languages ​​of UT and is well recognized in J&K legislation. There are several dialects spoken around these rivers like Dogri, Pahari, Gojari, Poonchi, Chubali , pothwari, etc. but the truth is that these spoken dialects grew up drinking Punjabi mother’s milk. It is a clear fact that it is a collection of various manifestations of Punjabi culture. Punjabi is the common heritage of Muslims, Sikhs, Hindus, Christians, Buddhists, etc. Among thousands of languages, Punjabi ranks fifth after English, Chinese, Urdu and Dutch. According to Mohan Singh Deewana from 14th to 15th century, we have Old Punjabi in which Lahndi predominates.

Punjabi language and literature are vital and stronger, in terms of thoughts. Language, in individualization, is a matter of phonetics, and the phonetics of race, climate and diet. In our UT, the spoken Punjabi dialects intertwine with each other with close affinity. These dynamic waves are full of essence in different sub-dialects of the Punjabi language. Over time, conscious and subconscious ideas have flourished among the tribes and races of the world. Drew Fredrick simplified this correlation with an appropriate model. The Punjabi language and literature have enhanced the historical cultural aspects of our UT and in this way invaluable assets of our rich glory and heritage are crafted into our soil. It is a true fact that Jammu and Kashmir has linguistic, social, cultural, literary, political, historical, economic, religious relations with the State of Punjab and communication ties only through this language. The uniqueness of Punjabi literature is that it belongs to every citizen irrespective of caste, creed and religion. There is no script rigidity, it is easily written in Gurmukhi, Persian, Devnagri as per need, knowledge or suitability.

I am pleased to introduce some Punjabi Muslim writers from our Jammu and Kashmir, who have enriched Punjabi literature to its core.

Aziz Khan Karnahi

This Punjabi poet was born in Karnah (Thithwal, Kashmir) in 1896 AD. Due to economic constraints, he was unable to publish his works. He was one of the pioneers of the Punjabi literary society. Among his works, the poem “The Wisdom of God” became very popular. This poet died in Karnah in 1981 AD.

Abdullah Larvi

Abdullah Larvi was born in Sanjora Balakot (Hazara) in 1863 in the house of Mian Fullful. It is mentioned in Tawarikh that he had four marriages. He stayed in Wangat (Kashmir) and preached Islam and continued to write Siharfis under the guise of a fakir. Published Majmu’a Siharfi in Punjabi. Some of these books were also written in Urdu. He died in 1926 AD in Wangat, popularly known as ‘Wangat Nagri’.

Iqbal Azeem Chowdhary

Mian Mohammad Iqbal, pen name Iqbal Azeem Chowdhary, pedagogue, writer, poet, author and critic, born in Pahalnar Wangath Kangan Kashmir in April 1940. Mian Mohammad Akbar Bajran belongs to the Bakarwal tribe of the Gujjar community. Resides in Udder (Baba Nagri) Tehsil Kangan Ganderbal. Iqbal Azeem Chowdhary is a famous writer, poet and author of Gojri, Punjabi and Urdu languages. He is the author of a number of books in Urdu Punjabi and Gojri and has edited a number of titles and periodicals in different languages, published by the Academy of Arts, Culture and Languages ​​of Jammu- and Kashmir. Received previous education at Government Mobile School lamberi Nowshera then joined Kangan High School and later joined Oriental College Srinagar for Higher Education and completed Honors in Urdu and Persian with Honors from University of Kashmir. Started working as the first broadcaster of Gojri at Radio Kashmir Srinagar in 1969. He worked as an editor and cultural officer of the Gojri section at the Academy of Arts, Culture and Languages ​​of Jammu and Kashmir and retired from this service in 2000. His published works are “REEJH KAWALLIEN”, “DHARTI KA ZAKHM”, “PAYAAB” and Punjabi Publications: “KULLI NI FAQEER DI WICHOON”. He died on December 15, 2021.

Syed Hussian Shah Bukhari

Bukhari was born approximately between 1906 and 1911 AD. This Sufi poet was born in Poonch. His remarkable poems were accompanied by his nature and used a common colloquial language.

Sarfraz Hussain Khan Tasin

This Punjabi poet was born on January 2, 1908 in Manganad, Poonch. His nickname was Tasin Zafri. He got education till matric and Adib Fazal. He was a teacher at Poonch until 1947, then went to Pakistan. Later he joined Rawalpindi Radio Station and he continued to publish Rawalpindi’s weekly “Kashmir”. He wrote in Urdu and Punjabi, but he composed poems in Punjabi. He died on June 26, 1955 in Lahore.

Sarwar Husan

Sarwar Hasan was born in the village of Rajouri (Kashmir) Dhankot in the house of Maulana Mehridin Qamar Awanan in 1942 AD. After completing basic education, he became a teacher in the education department. In 1965, Sarwar went into exile in Abbottabad (Pakistan). In 1980, he returned to his native Rajouri. Wrote a lot of poetry in Punjabi, which could not be published in book form. Newspapers and magazines continued to be adorned. This poet died on August 25, 2000 in Rajouri.

Salim Kosher

Salim Kasher was born to Muhdeen and Mehtab Begum on October 8, 1932 in Anantnag (Kashmir). He was Chief Cashier at Pakistan National Bank for many years. Retired from National Bank of Pakistan, Lahore. His books published in Punjabi are: Tatian Chhawan (1963), Surghi Da Tara (1978), Hawa Di Suli (1982). These books have also received awards from various organizations.

Doctor Sabar Afaqi

Dr. Saber Afaqi was born in the house of Maulana Ali Muhammad Fakhra in 1933 in Gohari village, Muzaffarabad (Kashmir). His real name is Chaudhry Ahmed Din Famra. After primary education in Persian and Arabic, he became an Arabic teacher in the Department of Education in 1952. Completed FA (1952), BA (1960), MA (Urdu, Persian) in 1965 so that he was on duty. He became a lecturer at Muzaffarabad in 1967. He went to Iran to do his doctorate in Persian, where he obtained his doctorate in Persian translation from Rajatarangani in 1972. He continued to serve as an associate professor at Muzaffarabad College. He also wrote Athru (1966), Hara (1967), Phulkheli (1976) and published three volumes in the Punjabi language.

Hazur Shah, Pir

Pir Hazur Shah was born in 1833 AD in the village of Gulpur (Poonch). He was the recognized elders of the region. Much of his poetry was destroyed in the 1947 holocaust. This poet died in Chhatra (Poonch) in 1980.

Habibullah Shah Bukhari, Syed

Habibullah Shah was born in the Pakhli (Kashmir) region of Kaghan. He was a good Punjabi poet and a scholar of Arabic and Persian. Spiritual color and Sufi ideology are evident in the poems. His manuscript book ‘Miraj Alxas’ is present in the village of Pamrot. Arabic-Persian words also appeared in the poems. He died in 1923 AD.

Khalid Hussain

Khalid Hussain was born to his mother Batul Begum on April 1, 1945 in Udhampur (Jammu). He retired from the position of Deputy Commissioner after serving in various positions. He is basically a good short story writer and is associated with many literary societies. He was several times President of Jammu Kashmir Punjabi Sahit Sabha, Srinagar and organized the All India Punjabi Conference. As a journalist, he remained editor of Sandesh, Amarad, Waqt, Zimmidaar, Hamdard, Political Times, Kanwash, etc. His published books include The Jhelum Vagada Raha (1976), Gauri Fasal De Saudagar (1980), Deep Paniyan Da Suhar (1988), Noori Rishma etc. Apart from these, he has received many awards. Recently, he received the Sahitya Academy Award for his Punjabi book Sullian da Sallan.

Khuda Bakhsh

Khuda Bakhsh was born in Mahut (Poonch) village in 1888 in Halim Dahar. Having experienced hardships as a child, he gained a modest education and began to do domestic work. The poem begins with the stumble of Ishq. It was natural for him to mature in poetry enjoying the company of the court of Baba saheb and gaining guidance from Kader Bakhsh. Much of his speech is present through the Punjabi ‘Shi-harfi’ and ‘baramanh’. The entire Kalam of Punjabi is still unprinted. Some Shi-herfies were included by Mian Bashir Ahmad Larvi in ​​his book Nir-Samundar. Khuda Bakhsh died in the village of Mahut in 1982.

Ghulam Hyder Gulzar

This Punjabi poet was born in 1904 AD in Mandi Poonch. He continued to serve as Maulvi after acquiring Muktab’s training. He wrote many poems in Punjabi. He died at the age of 49.

Ghulam Nabi Rasleen

This poet was born in the first quarter of the 18th century. This poet was a resident of Bilgram, Srinagar (Kashmir). He wrote a poetic treatise which has 1154 couplets and finished this treatise in 1154 Hijri. The language of this poetic text revolves around a simple language. The name of this poetic treatise is “Rasa Pravandha”.

(TO BE CONTINUED)

(The author can be contacted on: jbsingh.801@gmail.com)

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