Poetry – PC Lunwen http://pclunwen.com/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 16:51:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://pclunwen.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/favicon.png Poetry – PC Lunwen http://pclunwen.com/ 32 32 NIT Ecological Club Holds Poetry Recitation Contest https://pclunwen.com/nit-ecological-club-holds-poetry-recitation-contest/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 16:51:11 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/nit-ecological-club-holds-poetry-recitation-contest/ Srinagar, 04 January: The National Institute of Technology (NIT) Ecological Club in Srinagar held a virtual poetry contest titled ‘Poetry Slam’ on Tuesday, in which various environmental issues were discussed and highlighted by the participants. The theme of the event was “Environmental Problems Faced in the Modern Age” highlighting global warming, which is the greatest […]]]>

Srinagar, 04 January: The National Institute of Technology (NIT) Ecological Club in Srinagar held a virtual poetry contest titled ‘Poetry Slam’ on Tuesday, in which various environmental issues were discussed and highlighted by the participants.

The theme of the event was “Environmental Problems Faced in the Modern Age” highlighting global warming, which is the greatest environmental threat people have ever faced.

Director of NIT Srinagar, Prof. (Dr) Rakesh Sehgal said that the only way to preserve the environment and its beauty is to reduce consumption, reuse material goods and recycle our unwanted goods.

“Climate change can be solved by switching to renewable energy production, promoting the development of environmentally friendly things and upgrading infrastructure,” he said.

Professor Sehgal also appreciated the organizers for organizing such events. Such initiatives aim to create a stress-free atmosphere on campus, he said.

Professor Sehgal also shared some of his life experiences and told of his deep interest in poetry.

In his message, NIT Registrar, Prof. Kaiser Bukhari appreciated the organizers of the one-day event. He said the main objective of the event was to educate students on current environmental challenges and their possible solutions.

On the occasion, Professor (Dr) Mushtaq Ahmad Rather, who is the president of EcoCult, the ecological club of the National Institute of Technology. He appreciated the students and said such events will also be held in the future.

The participants were judged by the famous writer, star-Gazer and poet Ms. Shilpa, who was the main guest of the event. She also shared her journey and how she became a writer.

Ms. Shilpa also mentioned her first book “Love, Feel, Pain, Heel”. She said that a poem or any kind of writing will always help the person feed their soul.

Among several entries for the competition, the top 5 poems were selected for the event. Qazi Adnan clinched the top position and won the competition. While Kamran Elyas became the first dolphin, and Nadeem

Hamid became the second runner-up.

The event was organized by Reet Patel and Gopika Mahajan and coordinated by Ishika Gupta and Naqshab Agnihotri, and EcoCult committee members.

On this occasion, Prof. (Dr.) MA Rather congratulated the winners and all participants. He said Eco Cult. has been organizing such events for several years. We will also continue to hold such events in the future, he said.

In conclusion, a vote of thanks was given by Reet Patel and Gopika Mahajan. They also expressed their gratitude to the NIT Director for his support and encouragement in conducting such events in the institution.

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Poetry beyond the shadows of a whisper – New Telegraph https://pclunwen.com/poetry-beyond-the-shadows-of-a-whisper-new-telegraph/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 00:26:51 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/poetry-beyond-the-shadows-of-a-whisper-new-telegraph/ Shadows Of Whisper by Ladi Soyode is a hybrid collection of 82 seminal poems designed in a tripartite structure – ‘Brevity’, ‘Verse’ and ‘Prose-poems’, a categorization which seems somewhat idiosyncratic but for which the author can conveniently appreciate the most poetic license brandished. I must hasten to state at the outset that all three sections […]]]>

Shadows Of Whisper by Ladi Soyode is a hybrid collection of 82 seminal poems designed in a tripartite structure – ‘Brevity’, ‘Verse’ and ‘Prose-poems’, a categorization which seems somewhat idiosyncratic but for which the author can conveniently appreciate the most poetic license brandished. I must hasten to state at the outset that all three sections are eminently qualified as poetry in the finest sense of the art. The “brevity”, the opening section, is no less poetic since, in any case, parsimony in stylistic phraseology is one of the fundamental characteristics of primitive poetry – the creative ability to pack maximum meaning into the minimum support, to transmit the most message with the least language. Brevity is therefore stylistic efficiency, the management of linguistic resources in the expression of the finest thought.

The second section of Soyode’s collection, which bears the clear and self-revealing label of “Verse”, is a tacit assertion of the obvious, while the third and final category contains “Prosepoems” which I had to wrongly addressed in my initial reading as polyphonic. prose. The seven prose poems of “Shadow of a Whisper” are difficult to fit into polyphonic prose because they lack generic attributes of prose such as clear sentence boundaries, fidelity to punctuation, and a distinct narrative plot or explanatory card. They have been correctly referred to as prose poems, i.e.

poems constructed with a certain prosaic flavor in the form of paragraphs, but which nonetheless hide in their flowing rhythmic complex and captivating patterns and tropes. Indeed, all 82 pieces in the collection are poems of varying lengths and structures organically united by an uncanny faith in the possibilities of hope and redemption through love in a world ravaged by lust and hate, powerfully portrayed through captivating, juicy and memorable images. diction and enchanting melody.

Adopting the dominant Judeo-Christian cosmology lightly flavored with Yoruba mythology, Soyode deftly manipulates the English language to configure the dilemmas that plague unregenerate humanity trapped in the dialectic of dualities of curious contrasts and contradictions. Oscillating through the three layers of realities and human experience, that is to say the sensitive, the mental and the spiritual, the poet paints a world ravaged by the wars of the body, the spirit and the soul. soul whose phenomenology as a critical-philosophical approach is well suited. to deconstruct. Given the Judeo-Christian cosmography in which the collection is set, the biblical influence manifests itself through the poems in the form of allusions, echoes and insinuations – the indirect expiation of sin, the syndrome of Judas, the baptismal rites, the crucifixion, the lamb of love, the angelic hosts, among the lot that permeates the atmosphere.

The poet highlights the deception and danger of lust and infatuation and other forms of carnal desire in this modern age where sex has been completely democratized. He warns in very powerful and piquant imagery that the search for fulfillment and lasting happiness in the misadventures of midnight is akin to the futility and folly of seeking the sun in the dead of night (p.78 ). Conversely, the world of true lovers, according to the poet, is a rhyme, a rhythm, a harmony, like the words of a beautiful poem (p.28). Drawing on the cerebral, if iconoclastic, musicality of Abami Eda (the strange one who never dies), Fela Anikulapo Kuti, the poet identifies with the avant-garde role of the artist as friend of the masses, enemy of monstrous masters, as graphically depicted in “You Can’t”.

Art, therefore, especially poetry, is the abandonment and fruition of the soul which recalls and redirects amnesiac humanity. In this regard, the artist is the memory and reminder of his race, his prophetic guide and guardian spirit (p.50). In the eponymous poem, “Shadows of a Whisper”, the poet wrestles with the artist’s mandate and burden to distill perfection from imperfection, impose order on apparent disorder, and expose disorder. in a deceptive order, all for the purpose of fulfilling its role as the beacon of hope and rebirth. The poet confesses his fervent faith in a God who listens, the same Author of “the tragic flowering of a faded rose” and of “the magic of the silent boom”. In the dialectic of contrasts and contradictions, opposites negate, combine and finally annihilate; God alone is the lasting strangeness (pp.38-39).

In ‘Lost or Found’, the poet further preaches the reciprocity of love as the basis for sustainable development and lasting happiness, that is, love should be shared and not hoarded. It is then and only then that the black rage that is currently ravaging the nation can be overcome and annihilated by the light of love in the complex dialectic of the contrasting and contradictory dualities of our phenomenal world. But the poet’s redemptive and regenerative vision is not simply nationalistic; it is also at the same time Afrocentric, Pan-African and universal. Shadows of a Whisper contains ingeniously knit nuggets of wisdom wrapped in vivid epigrams, witty aphorisms and pungent paradoxes: “The earth is a jungle of wolves”; “Life is a fragile gift” (p.42); “At maturity, all eggs give life” (p.43); “Humanity is not nice at all”; “Scorpions and snakes speak the dialect of poisonous bloom”; “The earth shelters savagery” (p.48); “Humanity, the king of beasts” (p.46), etc.

The parting lesson for Nigeria is that patriotic and philanthropic love must spring from the soul and that is what we must possess rather than bitter inter-regional, inter-ethnic and inter-religious rivalry, bigotry and antipathy.

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First Citizens National Poetry Slam celebrates… | Local features https://pclunwen.com/first-citizens-national-poetry-slam-celebrates-local-features/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 00:04:00 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/first-citizens-national-poetry-slam-celebrates-local-features/ As the First Citizens National Poetry Slam celebrates its tenth anniversary, Bocas Lit Fest CEO Jean-Claude Cournand praised the competition which he says has evolved from humble beginnings to become the greatest competition of spoken word in the English-speaking Caribbean. The ‘slam’, as it is popularly known, has not only had an impact on youth […]]]>

As the First Citizens National Poetry Slam celebrates its tenth anniversary, Bocas Lit Fest CEO Jean-Claude Cournand praised the competition which he says has evolved from humble beginnings to become the greatest competition of spoken word in the English-speaking Caribbean. The ‘slam’, as it is popularly known, has not only had an impact on youth development by providing young men and women with a platform to express their views and opinions, but it has also helped participants of all ages to pursue their careers and aspirations.
Prior to 2012, spoken word was performed in bars and pubs and was a form of entertainment with many performers vying for crowd attention and a modest reward. But the “2 Cents Movement” which consisted of Cournand and other artists started the “Slam” which became the Verses Bocas Poetry Slam in 2012 which later evolved into the First Citizens National Poetry Slam (FCNPS) as we know it now.
It all started ten years ago when Cournand, who was the poetry slam organizer at the University of the Southern Caribbean, was approached by Bocas Lit Fest (where he was the youth outreach coordinator) and tasked to organize a spoken word competition which would be the flagship event to close the annual Bocas Lit festival. It seemed only fitting to have spoken, which is poetry in motion, under the Bocas Lit Fest umbrella.
With support from First Citizens, the poetry slam competition known then as Verses was held at the sold-out Old Fire Station in 2013.
“The contest was first introduced to young people because they were the vibe, the people who made this thing go viral,” said Alette Liz Williams, Bocas Lit Fest’s marketing and media manager. “The jokes were what everyone was looking forward to. They looked forward to their lyrical songs because they were like calypsonians talking about what was happening in society and at home. They used the space as a place where they could express how they felt.
The success was repeated the following year and in 2015 another milestone was reached when the spoken word artists performed at the Globe Cinema in Port of Spain which was packed to capacity. In the years that followed, Cournand and other organizers increased his production value. Buoyed by the growing popularity of the competition, they made the bold and bold decision to rename it the National Slam Poetry Competition before it officially became known as First Citizens National Poetry Slam.
Seeing FCNPS, which has one of the highest monetary prizes in the world for spoken word, reach the level it is at now is one of the most rewarding experiences of Cournand’s life. Poetry and spoken word have always been an integral part of his life, at the age of 12 he performed a monologue and won second place in the 12 and under talent competition, narrowly missing the prize of a trip to Disneyland.
“I am very proud, we have really fought for spoken word to develop and reach a level of permanence. Young people like to start and stop things and it’s hard to hold something for ten years and yet we’ve had a slam every year regardless of challenges and transitions and we have one of the biggest spoken word prizes in the world. To be part of such a significant contribution to spoken word is one of our greatest accomplishments,” Cournand said.
Burning issues like body shaming, mental health, domestic violence, Islamophobia and suicide have infiltrated the discussions and are on the big stage via the spoken word poets. The competitive slam is what’s unique to FCNPS, Williams said; it goes beyond performance and entertainment. It forces poets to go as far as possible to make a statement and shape perspectives and let people think differently about the things that matter, she added.
Reigning slam champion Derron Sandy was introduced to spoken word in 2009 when he heard Gary Acosta perform at the UWI Open Mic. The role of speech is to reflect society and give people something positive to hold on to, a fact Sandy takes very seriously.
“On a personal level, I just like to play; speech aligns with my life,” Sandy said. “And seeing all the good it brings to people makes me happy, being able to share this art form with others and seeing others reach the level of performance is very rewarding. Spoken words help me make the subjects more mundane enjoyable and exciting and, most importantly, it’s an art form that helps you become empathetic and learn other people’s points of view.
Slam enabled self-evolution, Williams said. The poets knew how to recreate, refine and redefine themselves through slam and carry the Caribbean identity further. FCNPS now seeks to strengthen the impact of slam and elevate the brand and voice of slam for future generations, she added. Bocas Lit Fest offers specific, free slam workshops for those who want to learn and develop their skills, regardless of age.
The pandemic has underscored the need for organizers and performers to adapt as auditions move from in-person to virtual. For the first time since 2020, poets will return to the stage and their performances will be broadcast on TTT. The First Citizens National Poetry Slam finalists will take the stage at the Naparima Bowl in San Fernando on October 9. The final round of the spoken word championship will be a joint celebration of ten years of Slam and the 60th anniversary of the Naparima Bowl.

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10 upcoming art and poetry exhibitions along the Wales Coast Path https://pclunwen.com/10-upcoming-art-and-poetry-exhibitions-along-the-wales-coast-path/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 04:43:50 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/10-upcoming-art-and-poetry-exhibitions-along-the-wales-coast-path/ Wales’ leading artists and poets will unveil new creative works this autumn, as 10 pop-up exhibitions appear along the Wales Coast Path – to celebrate 10e anniversary. Celf Coast Cymru’s exhibitions will be housed in creative spaces along the Wales Coast Path – from the National Waterfront Museum in Swansea to Harlech Castle in Gwynedd. […]]]>

Wales’ leading artists and poets will unveil new creative works this autumn, as 10 pop-up exhibitions appear along the Wales Coast Path – to celebrate 10e anniversary.

Celf Coast Cymru’s exhibitions will be housed in creative spaces along the Wales Coast Path – from the National Waterfront Museum in Swansea to Harlech Castle in Gwynedd.

The exhibitions will feature the work of 20 artists and poets from across Wales, all inspired by the extraordinary natural beauty of the 870-mile trail.

The first inaugural launch will take place tomorrow (Thursday 22 September) at Turner House, Penarth – also marking Hanan Issa’s first event as the new National Poet of Wales, alongside lead artist Dan Llywelyn Hall. Other sites will follow later in September and October.

Featured artists include Manon Awst, Bob Guy and Simon Page – all of whom will bring different mediums to the project, from sculptures to woodcuts and graffiti.

Meanwhile, participating poets include Gillian Clarke, Ceri Wyn Jones and Llion Pryderi Roberts – each tasked with producing work that reflects their local part of the Welsh coast, curated by Ifor ap Glyn.

The project’s lead artist, Dan Llywelyn Hall, said: “With Offa’s Dyke Path and Glyndŵr’s Way, the Wales Coast Path opens up an arterial journey around Wales, providing endless scope for exploration for artists and poets involved in this project.

“The powerful artwork created pays homage to Wales’ rich history of trade, settlement, migration, industry and survival – which has shaped the rugged wonder of our nation over the centuries. And I can’t think of a better time to celebrate it, than during the 10e anniversary of the Wales Coast Path.

First Minister of Wales, Mark Drakeford, added: “The Wales Coast Path is one of the glories of Wales and one of the proudest achievements of devolution.

“It has stood out as a beacon of our country’s natural beauty and will provide much inspiration to artists and poets as they celebrate this milestone.”

Additionally, to mark the launch of the hubs, Chris Jones – renowned meteorologist and presenter – will host a series of four bespoke guided walks in October.

As well as views of the affected individual stretch of the Wales Coast Path, the walks will also give the public a first look at four of the exhibition spaces – Carmarthen Library, Pontio Theater and Arts Center in Bangor, Riverfront Theater and Arts Center in Newport and Castle of Harlech.

With only 25 places available on each march, those interested in participating are encouraged to book their free ticket as soon as possible through Eventbrite.

Clare Pillman, Managing Director of Natural Resources Wales, said: “Over the past 10 years, the Wales Coast Path has encouraged hundreds of thousands of visitors to go beyond the country’s traditional tourist attractions and explore all that our spectacular stretch of coastline a. to offer.

“And thanks to the wealth of creative talent in Wales, we’re proud to now offer 10 more landmarks to explore and admire along the Trail this autumn – housing works that have been directly inspired by our wonderful Path.”

Full list of exhibition venues, including opening dates and participating artists and poets:

  • Pontio, Bangor University, LL57 2TQ.

Opening date: October 15

Artist: Wendy Dawson

Poet: Zoe Skoulding

  • Uchelder Centre, Millbank, Holyhead, LL65 1TE.

Opening date: September 24

Artist: Manon Awst

Poet: Lion Pryderi Roberts

  • Plas Glyn and Weddw, Llanbedrog, Gwynedd, LL53 7TT.

Opening date: October 21

Artist: Brian Jones

Poet: Guto Dafydd

  • Harlech Castle, LL46 2YH.

Opening date: October 29

Artist: Liz Neal

Poet: Haf Llewelyn

  • Aberystwyth Center for the Arts, SY23 3DE.

Opening date: October 03

Artist: Bob Guy

Poet: Ceri Wyn Jones

  • Oriel and Park, St Davids, SA62 6NW.

Opening date: October 01

Artist: Stephen West

Poet: Gillian Clarke

  • Carmarthen Library, Carmarthen, SA31 1LN.

Opening date: October 08

Artist: Iwan Bala

Poet: Elinor Gwynn

  • National Waterfront Museum, Swansea, SA1 3RD.

Opening date: October 06

Artist: Simon Page

Poet: Natalie Holborow

  • The Riverside, Newport, NP20 1HG.

Opening date: October 22

Artist: Neale Howells

Poet: Robert Minhinnick

  • Turner House Gallery, Penarth, CF64 3DH.

Opening date: September 22

Artist: Dan Llywelyn Hall

Poet: Hanan Issa, National Poet of Wales 2022-25.

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PRESS ROOM: Poetry Foundation Makes History by Honoring 2022 Pegasus Laureates https://pclunwen.com/press-room-poetry-foundation-makes-history-by-honoring-2022-pegasus-laureates/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 21:40:04 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/press-room-poetry-foundation-makes-history-by-honoring-2022-pegasus-laureates/ CHICAGO —The Poetry Foundation is proud to announce the winners of the 2022 Pegasus Awards, a family of literary prizes that includes the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, the Young People’s Poet Laureate, and the Pegasus Award for Poetry Criticism. Winners will be honored at an awards ceremony in Chicago in October. In recognition of Poetry […]]]>

CHICAGO —The Poetry Foundation is proud to announce the winners of the 2022 Pegasus Awards, a family of literary prizes that includes the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, the Young People’s Poet Laureate, and the Pegasus Award for Poetry Criticism. Winners will be honored at an awards ceremony in Chicago in October.

In recognition of Poetry magazine’s 110th anniversary, the Poetry Foundation has decided to award 10 additional Ruth Lilly Poetry Prizes this year, which will result in $1,132,500 in prizes distributed to 2022 winners. This is the most great prize the Foundation has ever given to a cohort of living poets at any given time.

“We are celebrating 110 years of Poetry magazine this year and approaching 20 years of the Poetry Foundation in 2023. We wanted to do something special to mark these milestones by honoring an exceptional cohort of writers whose work has brought comfort and inspiration to so many,” said Poetry Foundation President Michelle T. Boone. “Poetry shows us the way forward, and there is no poetry without the imagination and talent of those behind the pen.”

Honor 11 living legends

The Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize is awarded annually to a living American poet with a $100,000 prize in recognition of outstanding life’s work; it is one of the most prestigious awards given to American poets and one of the country’s top literary prizes.

In honor of the 110th anniversary of Poetry and in line with goals announced in its new strategic plan, the Poetry Foundation is awarding 11 Ruth Lilly Poetry Prizes in 2022. The decision not only commemorates a historic milestone for the Foundation and the magazine, but celebrates a diversity of backgrounds and styles of poets. whose contributions to culture warrant the same recognition given to artists in other forms.

The 11 winners of the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize for 2022 are:

Sandra Cisneros is a poet, short story writer, novelist and essayist whose work explores working class life. The novel of Cisneros The Mango Street House has been translated into over 25 languages ​​and is required reading in elementary, secondary and college schools across the country. His awards include a MacArthur Fellowship, a National Medal of Arts, and a PEN/Nabokov Prize for International Literature, among others. the new collection of poetry by Cisneros, woman without shameis published by Knopf and Vintage Español in a Spanish translation.

CAConrad has been working with ancient technologies of poetry and ritual since 1975; their honors include a Lambda Literary Award. As young poets, they lived in Philadelphia, where they lost many loved ones during the early years of the AIDS crisis, as evidenced in the essay “SIN BUG: AIDS, Poetry, and Queer Resilience in Philadelphia” . Conrad is the author of numerous collections of poetry, including AMANDA PARADISE: Resurrecting the Dead Vibration and Queuing for death.

Dove Rita is a writer of poetry, fiction, drama, and essays who was the United States Poet Laureate from 1993 to 1995. Dove’s honors include an NAACP Image Award, a National Medal of Arts, and a Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, among others. His last volume of poems, Reading list for the apocalypse, was named “Top Book of 2021” by The New York Times. Dove teaches at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, where she holds the Henry Hoyns Chair in Creative Writing.

Nikki Giovanni is a poet and the author of several works of non-fiction and children’s literature, and several recordings, including the Emmy Award nominee The Nikki Giovanni Poetry Collection. Giovanni’s honors include a Langston Hughes Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Arts and Letters, seven NAACP Image Awards, and a Rosa Parks Women of Courage Award. His recent publications include Make Me Rain: Poems and Prose and In pursuit of utopia: a hybrid.

Juan Felipe Herrera is a poet and the son of agricultural workers; he was Poet Laureate of the United States and of California. Herrera’s awards include a National Book Critics Circle Award, a Los Angeles Times Robert Kirsch Lifetime Achievement Award and a Latino Hall of Fame Award, among others. He is the author of more than 30 books, including the recent collection of poetry Every day we get more illegal and the translation Akrílica. Juan Felipe Herrera Elementary School is scheduled to open in Fresno in the fall of 2022.

Angela Jackson is a poet, playwright, and novelist from Chicago who is currently Poet Laureate of Illinois. Jackson’s honors include a Pushcart Award and a Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America. His collection of poetry, All these roads be brightwas nominated for the National Book Award, and her first novel, where i have to go, won an American Book Award. Additionally, Jackson wrote four plays: comforting stew, Witness!, Shango Diaspora: an African-American myth of femininity and love.

Haki Madhubuti is a poet, author, publisher and educator. Madhubuti is widely considered one of the architects of the Black Arts Movement and is the founder and publisher of Chicago’s Third World Press. Madhubuti has published over 36 books, including his recent collection, Taught By Women: Poems as Language of Resistance, New and Selected. His honors include an American Book Award, a Hurston/Wright Legacy Prize, and a Studs Terkel Humanities Service Award, among others.

Sharon Olds is the author of 12 collections of poetry, including tunesshortlisted for the 2020 Griffin Poetry Prize, and The deer leap, winner of a Pulitzer Prize and a TS Eliot Prize. Olds’ other accolades include the inaugural San Francisco Poetry Center Award and a National Book Critics Circle Award. She teaches in New York University’s Graduate Creative Writing Program and helped found the NYU workshop program for residents of Coler-Goldwater Hospital on Roosevelt Island.

Sonia Sanchez is a poet, playwright, teacher, activist and one of the main leaders of the Black Studies movement. Sanchez is the author of more than 20 books, including morning haiku, Shake my skinand she collected poems, published in 2021. His accolades include an American Book Award, Anisfield-Wolf Lifetime Achievement Award, Langston Hughes Poetry Award, and Robert Frost Medal, among others; in 2011, she was named Philadelphia’s first Poet Laureate.

Patti Smith was born in Chicago, grew up in South Jersey, and moved to New York in 1967. Smith’s nonfiction and poetry books include Year of the Monkey, Dedicationand M-train; his new collection, A book of days, is to come. Her honors include the 2010 National Book Award for her best-selling memoir just childrena PEN/Audible Literary Service Award and a Doctor of Humane Letters from Columbia University.

Arthur Sze is a poet, translator and editor; he is the author of 11 poems, including The Constellation of Glass: New and Collected Poems and Lines of sight, which won a National Book Award for Poetry. Sze’s honors include a Shelley Memorial Award, Jackson Poetry Prize, and Lannan Literary Award, among others. He served as Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets from 2012 to 2017 and was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2017. He is Emeritus Professor at the Institute of American Indian Arts.

Recent winners of the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize include Marilyn Chin, Martín Espada, Joy Harjo, Marilyn Nelson and Patricia Smith.

Elizabeth Acevedo Named New Youth Poet Laureate
Elizabeth Acevedobestselling author of The poet X, will be the 2022-2024 Youth Poet Laureate. The prize and $25,000 prize is awarded to a living writer in recognition of a career devoted to writing outstanding poetry for young readers. The winner’s goal is to promote poetry to children and their families, teachers and librarians throughout their two-year tenure.

Acevedo’s second book, With the fire abovewas named “Best Book of the Year” by the New York Public Library, NPR, Weekly editorsand School library journal. Other honors include a boston globe-Horn Book Award, a National Book Award for children’s literature and a National Poetry Slam Championship. She will advise the Poetry Foundation on issues relating to children’s literature.

Recent youth poet laureates include Naomi Shihab Nye (whose tenure was extended due to hiatuses during the Covid-19 pandemic), Margarita Engle and Jacqueline Woodson.

Kevin Quashie Wins Pegasus Prize for Poetry Criticism
The Pegasus Award for Poetry Criticism recognizes annually a work of criticism of a book published in the previous calendar year and includes a prize of $7,500. Kevin Quashie is the 2022 winner for his book Black life or a poetics of beingwhich draws on black feminist literary texts, including the works of poets Lucille Clifton, Audre Lorde and June Jordan.

Quashie teaches black cultural and literary studies and is a professor in the English department at Brown University. Among his honors are a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities and a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, as well as citations for teaching excellence from Brown University and Smith College.

The 2022 Critics’ finalists were Anahid Nersessian for The Odes of Keats: A Lover’s Speech (The University of Chicago Press) and Rachel Zolf for No The witness of oneself: a monstrous poetics (Duke University Press).

About the Poetry Foundation
The Poetry Foundation recognizes the power of words to transform lives. We work to amplify poetry and celebrate poets by fostering spaces for all to create, experience and share poetry. Follow the Poetry Foundation on
Facebook, instagramand Twitterand Poetry to @PoetryMagazine.



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Kazakhstan celebrates 100 years of Syrbay Maulenov, great poet and warrior of the Patriotic War https://pclunwen.com/kazakhstan-celebrates-100-years-of-syrbay-maulenov-great-poet-and-warrior-of-the-patriotic-war/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 04:47:58 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/kazakhstan-celebrates-100-years-of-syrbay-maulenov-great-poet-and-warrior-of-the-patriotic-war/ NUR-SULTAN – Syrbay Maulenov, one of the few Kazakh poets and writers, whose life was devastated by the Second World War, was born 100 years ago on September 17. His works stemmed from his love for his homeland and embraced a wide range of subject matter from stark depictions of war to tender praises of […]]]>

NUR-SULTAN – Syrbay Maulenov, one of the few Kazakh poets and writers, whose life was devastated by the Second World War, was born 100 years ago on September 17. His works stemmed from his love for his homeland and embraced a wide range of subject matter from stark depictions of war to tender praises of the landscapes and nature of the homeland.

Syrbay Maulenov.

Born in the small town of Torgai in the northern region of Kazakhstan, Maulenov spent most of his childhood and adolescence in the city of Kyzylorda in southern Kazakhstan, where his family moved and where, in 1938 , he enrolled in the faculty of language and literature of the Kyzylorda. Pedagogical institute.

His studies at the institute were interrupted by the war in 1940, so when the call came, Maulenov was drafted into the Red Army of the Soviet Union.

Readers can always turn to Maulenov’s World War II poems for authentic images of suffering humanity. The terrible experiences of war and death on the Volkhov front found vivid expression in his following poetry:

In the fight for the forest,

A man was shot by the enemy.

Embracing his brave son,

The earth hugged him.

The forest surrounds it

Wrap it.

Rain and thunderstorms

Preserve his grave. (free translation by the author)

In an interview with the Zakon News Agency, his son, Kassym Maulenov, shared a unique story of the father’s interaction with Soviet poet and prose writer Nikolay Tikhonov even before they met.

Syrbay Maulenov with his son Kassym Maulenov (L). Photo credit: voxpopuli.kz

“I managed to find a letter in my father’s archives from the classic of Soviet literature Nikolay Tikhonov dated October 22, 1942, which was the response to my father’s letter. He said: “I am delighted that a young Kazakh poet is defending our beloved Leningrad with a gun in his hand. It will be time, and we will meet you in the city liberated from the siege, we will read your poems and talk about the great war of the Soviet people with the Nazis, as in the past,” the letter read.

In 1943, Maulenov was seriously injured in the left arm when breaking the blockade of Leningrad in the direction of the Volkhov front. Consequently, his arm became immobile.

“My father was a true internationalist united by his strong brotherly friendship with many eminent poets and writers,” Kassym Maulenov said, naming many well-known personalities including Sergei Narovchatov (Soviet poet), Vadim Kozhevnikov (Soviet writer), Yevgeny Yevtushenko (Soviet, Russian poet), Mustay Karim (Bashkir poet), Chingiz Aitmatov (Kyrgyz writer), Platon Voronko (Ukrainian poet), Mukhtar Auezov (Kazakh writer), Abdilda Tazhibaev (Kazakh poet) and Muzafar Alimbayev (Kazakh poet).

Syrbay Maulenov with Soviet poet Sergei Narovchatov (L). Photo credit: voxpopuli.kz

Maulenov’s first collection of poems reflecting his wartime days was published in 1948.

His poems about homeland, nature and life were equally beautiful and captivating. His poem “A Changed Land” illustrates the change of seasons and involuntarily guides the reader through the comfort of observing the change from warm July to cold autumn and freezing winter, as if recalling that the change itself is immutable.

Dry July wind,

The dampness of autumn passing through your ribs,

winter storms,

It won’t allow you to straighten up.

Lined up like cranes,

Many summers and autumns have passed.

A new map is drawn,

The young forest keeps the soul… (free translation by the author)

In total, Maulenov wrote more than 50 collections of poetry and prose. His words became part of the golden fund of Kazakh literature.

My childhood memory is marked by my father’s painstaking work on poems,” recalls Kassym Maulenov.

Along with poetry, Maulenov mastered various genres of journalism, from publicist and essayist to critic, satirist and editor. He actively participated in the periodical press and wrote numerous articles and essays.

“He often stayed up late at night in the dining room. On the weekends, we had typists at home, to whom my father would dictate his inspirational lines,” he said.

Maulenov worked as editor of Zhuldyz (Star) magazine in the 1960s and Qazaq Adebiyeti (Kazakh Literature) newspaper in the late 1950s and 1970s.

He was also actively involved in translation activities. He introduced the Kazakh reader to the works of Mikhail Lermontov, Alexander Pushkin, Sergei Esenin, Nikolay Nekrasov, Lord Byron, Shakespeare and many other famous classics of world literature.

In 1990, Maulenov was awarded the People’s Writer Prize of the Kazakh Soviet Socialist Republic.

Maulenov died in 1993 at the age of 70. Streets in four cities in Kazakhstan are named after him, as well as a school in his hometown.

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WALKS AND SPEECH: Poetry Rocks will feature 3 poets on Sunday | Free time https://pclunwen.com/walks-and-speech-poetry-rocks-will-feature-3-poets-on-sunday-free-time/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 13:41:00 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/walks-and-speech-poetry-rocks-will-feature-3-poets-on-sunday-free-time/ VERNON — Poets Pat Mottola and Aaron Caycedo-Kimura will headline Poetry Rocks on Sunday, Sept. 18 at 3 p.m. at the Arts Center East, 709 Hartford Turnpike. Tovah Oslovich from Rockville High School’s Creative Writing program will also be reading. Mottola is president of the Connecticut Poetry Society and teaches creative writing at Southern Connecticut […]]]>

VERNON — Poets Pat Mottola and Aaron Caycedo-Kimura will headline Poetry Rocks on Sunday, Sept. 18 at 3 p.m. at the Arts Center East, 709 Hartford Turnpike.

Tovah Oslovich from Rockville High School’s Creative Writing program will also be reading.

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An evening of film, poetry and photography during Peterborough Pride features three ‘distinctly queer voices’ https://pclunwen.com/an-evening-of-film-poetry-and-photography-during-peterborough-pride-features-three-distinctly-queer-voices/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 13:15:08 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/an-evening-of-film-poetry-and-photography-during-peterborough-pride-features-three-distinctly-queer-voices/ Jackson Creek Press presents “I Know A Place / Poetry Is Queer / Shot In A Mirror,” an evening of film, poetry and photography, at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, September 21 during Peterborough-Nogojiwanong Pride Week 2022. (Photo/Poster: Jeffrey Macklin/Jackson Creek Press) Three “distinctly queer voices” will be showcased during an evening of film, poetry and […]]]>
Jackson Creek Press presents “I Know A Place / Poetry Is Queer / Shot In A Mirror,” an evening of film, poetry and photography, at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, September 21 during Peterborough-Nogojiwanong Pride Week 2022. (Photo/Poster: Jeffrey Macklin/Jackson Creek Press)

Three “distinctly queer voices” will be showcased during an evening of film, poetry and photography on September 21 when Jackson Creek Press presents “I Know A Place / Poetry Is Queer / Shot In A Mirror” at Dreams Café and Bistro at downtown Peterborough.

It is one of many events taking place during Peterborough-Nogojiwanong Pride Week 2022, supporting and celebrating people of all sexual orientations and gender identities, which begins with the proclamation of Pride Week and The Progressive Pride Flag Raising at Peterborough Town Hall at 12:3pm on Friday September 16th and continues through Sunday September 25th.

The theme for this year’s Pride Week is “Joy and Resistance”, reflecting Pride’s origins in 1969, when police raided the Stonewall Inn, a gay club in New York’s Greenwich Village. When the police turned violent, the local gay community fought back. A year after the uprising, the first gay pride marches took place in Chicago, Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco.

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“I Know A Place / Poetry Is Queer / Shot In A Mirror” will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. on Wednesday, September 21 at Dreams Café and Bistro (138 Hunter St. W., 705-742-2406).

“It’s going to be an evening full of film, poetry, photography and some kind of dialogue,” says organizer Jeffrey Macklin, mixed media artist and graphic designer and owner of Jackson Creek Press in Peterborough.

The evening begins at 7 p.m. sharp with the screening of the short film I know a place by Roy Mitchell, podcaster, writer, educator and filmmaker who now lives in Hybla, Ontario.

“I Know A Place / Poetry Is Queer / Shot In A Mirror” features a short film by Roy Mitchell, poetry by Kirby and photography by Don Pyle. (Illustration: Jeffrey Macklin/Jackson Creek Press)

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The film tells the story of Robert Goddere, an Algoma-area man who was well known in what was then a fairly underground gay community in Sault Ste. Married. Goddere was known for his love of organizing gatherings for the gay community and had a tendency to care for members of his community, so much so that he jokingly referred to himself as a “mother”.

Mitchell made the 30-minute film in the 1990s, when he lived in Toronto and was part of the city’s art scene. After Macklin saw the film 20 years later, he knew it deserved a wider audience.

“When I saw Roy’s film, it made a deep impression on me even though the story is based in Sault Ste. Marie,” says Macklin, who came out 10 years ago. “It really resonated with my experience at Peterborough.”

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After Macklin secured a screening location for the film, he decided to find another job that would complement the film.

“I felt like there was an opportunity to make it a richer night,” he says.

Through community ties, Macklin contacted Toronto poet Kirby and Don Pyle, record producer, musician, composer, photographer and producer.

Filmmaker Roy Mitchell, photographer Don Pyle and poet Kirby.  (pictures provided)
Filmmaker Roy Mitchell, photographer Don Pyle and poet Kirby. (pictures provided)

Kirby is the knife editor | fork | book on knifeforkbook.com and can be found on Instagram @poetryisqueer. They are known for their poetry celebrating moments of queer love in a largely heteronormative world. However, Kirby also strives to make the voices of his fellow writers heard by hosting events, running workshops, and publishing textbooks.

Their latest book, Poetry is queeris described as “a hybrid genre memoir like no other” where “Kirby pays homage to gay touchstones while embodying both their labor and their joy.”

Pyle will join the event to show photos and read excerpts from his second book Shot in a mirrora collection of inspiring queer portraits.

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Pyle’s first book, Trouble in the Camera Club, is a collection of photos and essays documenting the beginnings of punk rock in Toronto. Pyle began his musical career in 1979 as a drummer in a punk band called Crash Kills Five. Pyle and two other band members would later form Shadowy Men on a Shadowy Planet, a Juno Award-winning band best known for the theme song to the Canadian sketch comedy television series. The children in the room.

Pyle and Kirby’s latest books will be available for purchase during the September 21 event.

Upon contacting Kirby and Don, Macklin was struck by the small size of the queer art scene in Canada, and particularly in southern Ontario. Not only do Kirby and Pyle know each other, they also know Mitchell.

Jeffrey Macklin, multimedia artist and graphic designer from Peterborough, owner of Jackson Creek Press, was motivated to curate 'I Know A Place / Poetry Is Queer / Shot In A Mirror' after seeing Roy Mitchell's short film
Jeffrey Macklin, multimedia artist and graphic designer from Peterborough, owner of Jackson Creek Press, was motivated to organize ‘I Know A Place / Poetry Is Queer / Shot In A Mirror’ after seeing Roy Mitchell’s short film ‘I Know A Place “. (Photo: Jeffrey Macklin/Facebook)

Cost for ‘I Know A Place / Poetry Is Queer / Shot In A Mirror’ is $20 suggested at the door, or pay what you can.

“I’m very aware that artists get paid because I’m an artist too,” Macklin says. “That was also a big factor in putting on this event – that we had enough money to reward them for their work.”

Macklin has also secured financial support for the event from local firms kawarthaNOW, Lett Architects, Basterfield & Associates, Unicity and Brant Basics as well as Peterborough Pride.

For a full list of 2022 Peterborough-Nogojiwanong Pride Week events, visit peterboroughpride.ca or kawarthaNOW’s Peterborough Pride Events column.

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POETRY | Chaotic loops | South Seattle Emerald https://pclunwen.com/poetry-chaotic-loops-south-seattle-emerald/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/poetry-chaotic-loops-south-seattle-emerald/ by Indigo Mays Curly hair strands rolled up as soft as possiblerefuse my request to lie on my head today.Combs, creams, creams and conditioners all try to reason with hair,But the curly, coiled strands of hair are still trying to touch the sky. Curly hair strands rolled up as soft as possibleare pushed picked and […]]]>

by Indigo Mays


Curly hair strands rolled up as soft as possible
refuse my request to lie on my head today.
Combs, creams, creams and conditioners all try to reason
with hair,
But the curly, coiled strands of hair are still trying to touch the sky.

Curly hair strands rolled up as soft as possible
are pushed picked and caressed,
by onlookers whose wandering hands end up
where they shouldn’t be.

Curly hair strands rolled up as soft as possible
descended from the elegant excellence who loved their rebellious curls.
Their curly crowns were worn as fine jewelry for the wealthy,
But the spectators saw this pride and forced the curls to become
silky straight.
Elegant excellence was forced to hide their curls,
as I cry in agony to get my curls laid like everyone else’s.

Curly hair strands rolled up as soft as possible
Perhaps often turbulent troubles,
but in its natural state, true beauty can be seen.

To strands of curly hair rolled up as soft as possible;
I love every little curl with all my heart,
please never change or be like others, oh so pretty you are.


Indigo Mays (she) is a high school student and an aspiring journalist with an interest in law. She found her voice through writing and enjoys sharing her work with others.

📸 Featured image: original photo by marianarodr/Nappy.co; edited by the Emerald team.

Before you move on to the next story …
Please consider that the article you just read was made possible by the generous financial support of donors and sponsors. The Emerald is a BIPOC-led nonprofit news outlet with the mission of offering a wider lens of our region’s most diverse, least affluent, and woefully under-reported communities. Please consider making a one-time gift or, better yet, joining our Rainmaker Family by becoming a monthly donor. Your support will help provide fair pay for our journalists and enable them to continue writing the important stories that offer relevant news, information, and analysis. Support the Emerald!

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Award-winning poet draws inspiration from everyday experiences for his latest collection https://pclunwen.com/award-winning-poet-draws-inspiration-from-everyday-experiences-for-his-latest-collection/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 04:41:24 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/award-winning-poet-draws-inspiration-from-everyday-experiences-for-his-latest-collection/ Award-winning poet Robert Currie will be in Prince Albert on Tuesday to read excerpts from his latest collection of new and selected poetry. — Photo courtesy of the Writers Guild of Saskatchewan. “I think a lot of the poems are better now,” Robert Currie laughs. Currie, the award-winning writer, teacher and past president of the […]]]>

“I think a lot of the poems are better now,” Robert Currie laughs.

Currie, the award-winning writer, teacher and past president of the Saskatchewan Writes Guild, is on the phone to talk about his latest book.

‘Shimmers of Light: New and Selected Poems’ was published in March by Thistledown Press and includes poems written as early as the 1970s and as recently as the past four years. On Tuesday, Currie will be in Prince Albert to give a reading and look back over five decades of poetry.

“I collected poems for a reading, trying to give people a selection of poems that I think have been an important part of my career,” Currie says from his home in Moose Jaw, where he taught English. English and creative writing at Central Collégial for 30 years. “I think there’s a lot here that suggests, referring to the title of the book, that the poems are like reflections of light in the darkness that sometimes surrounds us.”

Currie focuses on a variety of events and experiences in “Shimmers of Light”. Topics include everything from father-son relationships to old cowboy movies to his experience of visiting idyllic northern Saskatchewan spots like Waskesiu or Emma Lake. It also includes more eclectic subject matter, such as a poem about what it calls “a rather odd reading” that poet Robert Frost gave in California.

Whatever the subject, Currie aims to show readers the reality of life.

“I used an epigraph in the book of an American poet Wallace Stevens, and he said, ‘poetry is a response to the daily need to straighten out the world,'” Currie says. “What I’ve tried to do all these years is show the world how it is and how it affects me and people like me.”

The final poems in “Shimmers of Light” were all written after 2018, but there was a hitch along the way.

Coteau Books, the publisher Currie helped found in 1975, folded just before its 50th year in business. Currie served on Coteau’s volunteer board of directors for more than 40 years after helping to found it. The closure was demoralizing.

“It really hit me and kind of depressed me,” Currie says. “It happened just before it all shut down in March 2020. For a while there, I don’t know, seven (or) eight months, I didn’t write anything. I don’t know if it was because of COVID or because of what happened with Coteau Books going bankrupt, but after that I got over that and started writing a bit.

Getting back into the habit of writing proved to be a challenge. Currie’s regular writing group still met in person, but was forced to participate in Zoom meetings during the shutdowns.

Although the reunion wasn’t nearly the same, Currie says it ultimately worked out well and helped build on her selection of new poems, which cover enough material to fill a small book of their own.

He hopes the poems will bring back fond memories for residents who attend Tuesday’s reading.

“I hope it will increase their interest in reading and especially in reading poetry,” Currie says. “I think a lot of these poems will speak to them and may leave them thinking, ‘yeah, I remember things like that’ or ‘yeah, something like that happened to me once.'”

The Robert Currie author’s reading is scheduled for Tuesday at 7 p.m. at the John M. Cuelenaere branch of the Prince Albert Public Library.

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