Poetry – PC Lunwen http://pclunwen.com/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 20:49:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://pclunwen.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/favicon.png Poetry – PC Lunwen http://pclunwen.com/ 32 32 A Cree Author’s Book of Poetry Aimed to Empower Indigenous Children https://pclunwen.com/a-cree-authors-book-of-poetry-aimed-to-empower-indigenous-children/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 20:49:03 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/a-cree-authors-book-of-poetry-aimed-to-empower-indigenous-children/ Shayla Raine was sitting at her desk, looking out the window at an eagle’s nest and a view of the mountains, when she came up with the idea for a new poetry book for Indigenous children. After inspiration in the fall of last year, the Cree author and illustrator got to work writing The Way […]]]>

Shayla Raine was sitting at her desk, looking out the window at an eagle’s nest and a view of the mountains, when she came up with the idea for a new poetry book for Indigenous children.

After inspiration in the fall of last year, the Cree author and illustrator got to work writing The Way Creator Sees You.

“This book started out as an artistic outlet under the pressure of publishing my novel,” says Raine.

“I wanted this children’s book to be free of these pressures…so that I could write with a positive mindset and clear intentions to deliver this great medicine while getting my point across in a fun and engaging way.”

The Way Creator Sees You is Raine’s first published book, and it was released independently this month. The book aims to inspire Indigenous children who may be struggling with their identity and help them embrace who they are, says Raine, who is from Maskwacis, Alta.

The poetry book features a Plains Cree boy who faces adversity in school and struggles to come to terms with his Aboriginal characteristics. Son Kokom takes him on a lyrical adventure to help him appreciate his heritage.

Raine tells IndigiNews that she’s always wanted to write a children’s book that empowers Indigenous children because it’s something she never saw when she was younger.

Raine says the title of his poetry book; The Way Creator Sees You, comes from a poem she wrote about her partner.

“It was at the very end of the poem, I asked him, ‘Do you see yourself as the Creator sees you,’ and it came so naturally to me,” she says. “I stuck with that when I started writing my children’s book.”

The Way Creator Sees You contains 11 illustrations and 11 pages of free verse poetry with an informal rhyme scheme. Raine says there is a common rhyme pattern of “A, AB, B” throughout the poem that flowed naturally as she wrote it.

The book includes illustrations by Anwar Hussian as well as Raine. It is dedicated to Raine’s nephew, Nakomi Bellerose-Raine.

Raine says she took a poetry course at the University of British Columbia Okanagan (UBCO), before pursuing her children’s poetry book in September.

“I love to write, I love poetry and I’m currently working on a fictional novel which hopefully will be published later this year,” she says.

She says her biggest challenge has been finding patience in the writing process and the sometimes lengthy editing process. Her hopes are to overcome these challenges while working on her novel.

“I feel like as writers we struggle a lot with impostor syndrome, and I often feel like we have writer’s block and we have these challenges” , adds Raine, “I think it’s important to remember your why – why do you write?”

“I feel like my ‘why’ was, it helps me reconnect with my childhood dreams of being a writer.”

She says her advice to new writers is to believe you have a bigger purpose behind your writing.

“I’m going to show up and do this job because there’s a bigger purpose behind it, but, like, the universe also has to show up for me, too,” she says.

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The Poet’s Corner: Food for the Soul | Entertainment https://pclunwen.com/the-poets-corner-food-for-the-soul-entertainment/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 01:23:00 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/the-poets-corner-food-for-the-soul-entertainment/ MARIANNE LYON “Alone, we can do so little. Together we can do so much. – Helen Keller Fifteen courageous, masked and aloof poets and writers gathered at the Yountville Community Hall on January 8 to view poetry as food for the soul. Support local media coverage and those who report it by subscribing to the […]]]>

MARIANNE LYON

“Alone, we can do so little. Together we can do so much. – Helen Keller

Fifteen courageous, masked and aloof poets and writers gathered at the Yountville Community Hall on January 8 to view poetry as food for the soul.

“Every moment is a new beginning.” – TS Elliot

John Petraglia led a discussion on poetic ways of imagining hope, gratitude, new beginnings and community. Our objective for the afternoon was to fashion a found poem. The poets offered a line or two of their poems. John would take these lines and shape a poem. This found verse will be placed in the 500 bags distributed to the Napa Food Bank. Thanks to Copy Corner in Napa for free printing of the poems.

“As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not for speaking words but for living according to them.” John kennedy

Alan Arnopole has chanted songs to inspire verse. Some shared their drafts with a poet next to them. Other writers were very silent, waiting for the muse to urge them to shape a line. I was so impressed with these talented writers and the inspiring verses they created.

People also read …

“Poetry is when an emotion has found its thought and thought has found its words.” – Robert Frost

Here is the found poem that John Petraglia created and the wonderful poets mentioned below who contributed to this verse. What a joy to be in the presence of such soul feeders.

New Beginnings: Poetry is Food for the Soul

With the glow of the silver moon quarter

one foot forward, another follows

At night we see stars from distant galaxies

light frees darkness

Early dawn breaks the darkness

so it’s time to savor

more nutritious when shared

In a whirlwind of bright colors

radiate the love of the sun, the earth, the sky

embrace the gifts of nature

mustard blooms under the vines

mountains flooded with greenery

preferring like me the whole alive

I see how I hear moving in the flow

knowing that intonation can change reality

forward the road full of hope

Contributing poets included John Petraglia, Linda Kay Murphy, Cathy Carsell, Alan Arnopole, Eileen Tabios, Lance Burris, Joan Osterman, Robin Gabbert, John Armstrong, Jim McDonald, Suzanne Bruce, Kathy Edwards, Bill Murphy.

“The hope is to be able to see that there is light despite all the darkness.” – Desmond Tutu,

Knox Van Emst of Napa is a huge fan of the Hardy Boys book series. So much so that he spent the pandemic reading all of the Hardy Boys books – all 190 of them. Take a look here.



Jennifer Huffman, register



Marianne Lyon is the Napa County Poet Laureate.

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Local Author Releases 7th Book of Poetry in Time for Valentine’s Day | Newspaper https://pclunwen.com/local-author-releases-7th-book-of-poetry-in-time-for-valentines-day-newspaper/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/local-author-releases-7th-book-of-poetry-in-time-for-valentines-day-newspaper/ MARTINSBURG – Just in time for the start of the Valentine’s season, local author Khary Tolliver has love in his brain, recently releasing his seventh book, “Effortless Love”, a book of love poems and relational affirmations. Originally from the Bronx, New York, Tolliver moved to Hagerstown, Maryland, at age 12. He assigns a unique task […]]]>

MARTINSBURG – Just in time for the start of the Valentine’s season, local author Khary Tolliver has love in his brain, recently releasing his seventh book, “Effortless Love”, a book of love poems and relational affirmations.

Originally from the Bronx, New York, Tolliver moved to Hagerstown, Maryland, at age 12.

He assigns a unique task to a poetry journal for changing his life and makes him the author that he is today.

“I just took this assignment and kept running with it. We had to keep a journal of poems. I kept my journal until today, ”Tolliver said. “I had six previous books before this one, and the first two were about everything: life, my son, love, everything. By the time my third book came out, the comments I was getting on the first two books – and certainly from the second book – they liked the few love poems I had in there.

After receiving feedback, Tolliver thought, “I can do a whole book on love poems,” because he had a lot of poems written since high school.

“For my third book, I just did a whole book of love poems, and it was good, so I did another one. And I just kept going,” Tolliver said. “I love it. being able to express feelings and hopefully inspire others as well. I hope to inspire others to write poetry, and I did to a few anyway. “

Tolliver said this seventh book is a book of love poems but also relationship affirmations, reminding readers of some of the simple things in relationships that can be easily overlooked.

As a writer, Tolliver has chosen the path of self-publishing.

“Self-publishing is the way to go, for me,” he said. “I’m not trying to be a millionaire with these books. I just hope to reach people. I hope to inspire people, maybe change someone’s habits with my writing.

Tolliver explained that if he writes to inspire, he writes for himself, not for an audience.

“These are just my feelings, the feelings I see in other people’s relationships, my imagination, some of my own experiences,” he said. “That’s how I write: I put it all in one, and I get what I take out.”

Those interested in hearing some of Tolliver’s poems can also view readings on his YouTube channel, where Tolliver reads his poems from the pages of his posts.

“One thing I’ve learned so far on this trip is being able to take criticism,” Tolliver said. “When I write, these are my thoughts and opinions and feelings, and I think no one should really judge you by your feelings and thoughts. Everyone thinks about love differently and about life differently. I don’t think anyone should be judged for it.

With the ultimate goal of touching lives with his poetry, Tolliver hopes his poetry in “Effortless Love” and his other books will encourage readers to step back and live and love intentionally.

“Love is a beautiful thing,” Tolliver said. “Instead of getting the usual – the flowers, the candy, the teddy bear – give them something different this year, a book of love poems.”

“Effortless Love” and Tolliver’s other books of poetry can be purchased online at www.amazon.com under his name.

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Verse Affairs: Gadgets of the Heart https://pclunwen.com/verse-affairs-gadgets-of-the-heart/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 09:13:56 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/verse-affairs-gadgets-of-the-heart/ Any discussion of Instagram poetry, whether in popular or academic posts, tends to generally focus on two themes. First, how the popularity of poetry on social media saved a dying form and breathed new life into it. In India, much of the vitality of poetry on social media comes as poets find space to approach […]]]>

Any discussion of Instagram poetry, whether in popular or academic posts, tends to generally focus on two themes. First, how the popularity of poetry on social media saved a dying form and breathed new life into it. In India, much of the vitality of poetry on social media comes as poets find space to approach gender, caste, religion, and other concerns more successfully than ever before. By success I mean finding a larger audience than before and in some cases opportunities for monetization or publication. The other theme is whether such poetry has a trade – is it “good” or “bad”? Or: is it poetry?

The definitions of poetry are, of course, notoriously elusive – and determining quality even more difficult. “Good poets” also often write “bad” poetry. Perhaps the best reaction to the phenomenal popularity of Instagram poets was provided by Anglo-American poet Kazim Ali in his essay on Rupi Kaur: To do I think of Rupi Kaur? Well at first glance I’m a little bored that I spent so many years learning the craft, reading deeply, doing whatever I could to be a better poet because it seems like all that It takes, it’s superficial reflections, some pretty good (honestly) drawings, and a photo (admittedly great) to go viral and make you the most famous poet in the world, and perhaps of all time.

Karuna Ezara Parikh is no stranger to popularity – on social media or in the outside world. The former TV presenter, model and activist has nearly 85,000 Instagram followers, and the poems she shares – often in white text on a black background – are followed and loved by thousands of people. In India, where English poetry is mainly read by the poets themselves and published by small independent presses, such numbers are enough to provoke jealousy, expressed in a bohemian artistic contempt for popularity.

Parikh addresses this in the introduction to his recently published first book where stories come together (Noida: HarperCollins, 2021): “In a time when ‘Instagram poets’ are ubiquitous and the discussion about their popularity and merit erupts intermittently but constantly, it is terrifying to publish your work. She writes about the difficulty of distinguishing between good and bad work, between sincere poetry and insta-gratification. She says this makes her skeptical of her own poetry, which could be very popular online. Parikh calls it, very intelligently, “the gadget of the heart”.

There are some examples of these gadgets in where stories come together. Take, for example, ‘Monsoon III’ and ‘Monsoon IV’, part of a series of poems about the season. Both are rather short; the first says:

If there’s a word for ‘rain lover’
replace it forever
from now on
with my name

And the second:

You have rain outside and a window to look it through.
You have nothing to do with not being in love with the world.

These are exactly the kind of clichés that horrify any poet or poetry lover. One wonders what kind of editorial direction Parikh had. A good editor would have asked him not to include them in his book (and also to discreetly remove them from his Instagram page).

Fortunately, however, such examples are few. The book is divided into eight parts, with the poems arranged for no obvious structural reason – such as song cycles or a metric or thematic distinction. Parikh’s subjects are vast – from the usual broken heart in Paris ravaged by terrorist attacks or Delhi destroyed by poorly thought out architectural cosmetic surgeries. For example, “Write About What Hurts,” written in response to the Indian government’s Central Vista project that will lead to the demolition of some highly regarded structures in the nation’s capital:

Let’s not talk now
of the letter, once handwritten and kept, informing
of the death of Mangal Pandey or access this memory
of a boy you once loved, taking your dove hand to his
on the damp grass where adult men flexibly blew a rainbow
soap bubbles as slippery and quickly disappearing as our oil.

The image of the historic letter, kept in an archive that could become a victim of the Central Vista plan, and a memory of two lovers is brought together by the fleeting and momentary soap bubbles. This is compelling imagery of the ephemeral and the poet’s desire to capture part of it.

Such imagery, however, is sadly rare in the book. And without any metric tools to provide scaffolding, the poems often threaten to collapse on their own. All the poems are either in prose or in free verse – but the free verses are in reality randomly broken prose verses. They are easy to access but difficult to memorize.

Uttaran das guptathe novel of Ritual was released in 2020; he teaches at OP Jindal Global University, Sonipat. Das Gupta writes a bi-monthly column on poetry, ‘Worms business‘, for Thread.



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Inspirational poem by Irish artists in County Laois https://pclunwen.com/inspirational-poem-by-irish-artists-in-county-laois/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 15:00:58 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/inspirational-poem-by-irish-artists-in-county-laois/ A group of local Irish artists have come together to collaborate on an epic tribute to County Laois. Inspired by the history, mythology and beauty of Laois, the poetess of Portlaoise Laura Murphy composed a powerful tribute to the county, “In Laois I Fly Free”. In collaboration with three artists from Laois: the director of […]]]>

A group of local Irish artists have come together to collaborate on an epic tribute to County Laois.

Inspired by the history, mythology and beauty of Laois, the poetess of Portlaoise Laura Murphy composed a powerful tribute to the county, “In Laois I Fly Free”.

In collaboration with three artists from Laois: the director of photography Terry Byrne; musician Dale McKay; and singer Roo Elizabeth, this video poem is set in a haunting soundscape and complemented by cinematic scenes of the local landscape.

Shot at the Rock of Dunamase, Slieve Bloom Mountains, Oughaval Woods and Portlaoise; the poem and the video bring together the golden threads of magic that run through the past and the present of Laois. An evocative and inspiring piece that is sure to move the Laois people and beyond.

Told from the perspective of an ordinary Laois girl – Laura Murphy, the poem brings together dark and formidable things about Laois, taking us on a journey from the well-known “negative” associations of Laois to the lesser-known “positive” aspects.

Speaking of ‘In Laois I Fly For Free,’ Murphy said, ‘I’ve spent much of my life reminding myself that the best things about Laois are either jail or the road to get out of it. everywhere, Laois has its downsides, but there is also incredible beauty and magic to the place. “

The poem opens with a depiction of the perceived insignificance of the county, followed by the brutal revelation that Laois is both the place of origin of the British Empire and the place from which it began to fall.

The viewer is transported to a time when the Slieve Blooms were the tallest and oldest mountains in Europe. The poem goes even further to an earlier time when the mythical hero Fionn Mac Cumhaill was born in Ballyfin and became one of Ireland’s greatest warriors in those same mountains.

“The legend says that Fionn Mac Cumhaill never died. He is asleep and will wake up when Ireland needs him badly. Fionn’s archetypal energies of wisdom, purity, courage and truth are needed more than ever. This poem is also an ode to awakening these qualities in our own hearts. And a reminder that Fionn was a proud Laois, ”Murphy explained.

“In Laois I Fly Free” is supported by Creative Ireland Laois as part of the Creative Ireland program in partnership with Laois County Council.


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Kari Gunter-Seymour Renewed As Ohio Poet Laureate | News https://pclunwen.com/kari-gunter-seymour-renewed-as-ohio-poet-laureate-news/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 23:13:00 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/kari-gunter-seymour-renewed-as-ohio-poet-laureate-news/ ALBANY – Kari Gunter-Seymour, a resident of Albany who previously served as Athens’ Poet Laureate, has been reappointed by Governor Mike DeWine as Ohio’s Poet Laureate. She was first appointed to this post in June 2020, an appointment that was pushed back from the usual January decision due to the COVID-19 pandemic. As a ninth […]]]>

ALBANY – Kari Gunter-Seymour, a resident of Albany who previously served as Athens’ Poet Laureate, has been reappointed by Governor Mike DeWine as Ohio’s Poet Laureate.

She was first appointed to this post in June 2020, an appointment that was pushed back from the usual January decision due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

As a ninth generation Appalachian resident and third generation Athens County resident, Gunter-Seymour focuses her work on praising the people of the Appalachian Mountains of Ohio.

“When I took the job, the governor spoke to me on the phone and I said, ‘I’m going to raise my people. I’m going to raise the Appalachians,” Gunter-Seymour said.

During her previous tenure, she spent time working with a wide variety of Ohioians, from those navigating recovery and living in prison to those hoping to begin a career in poetry on their own. She traveled to several states for her job and as the pandemic ensued, she adapted and kept moving forward.

People believed due to the pandemic that his ability to serve the community would be limited, which Gunter-Seymour says is simply not the case. Even with the pandemic working against her, she “absolutely loved every minute” of her first term.

“I think the reason I attended so many events was that I felt everyone needed it,” Gunter-Seymour said. “Poetry is so healing. If you run into the right poet and find the one you love, it can change you.

During her pandemic workshops, she tried to help participants focus on mindfulness and self-forgiveness. She allowed people to address the feelings the pandemic has aroused while looking at the good things that are still happening around them.

Gunter-Seymour is particularly interested in Appalachian women, especially those who are incarcerated or recovering. She has a personal connection to the problem of drug addiction, having known people who have struggled with it. While at Ohio University, she worked with those who have experienced sexual abuse and neglect. It opened up a door for her to start working with women in recovery and then with those who are incarcerated.

“I often cried while listening to people write these great stories about their recovery and what they were planning to do when they were released,” Gunter-Seymour said. “You’d be amazed at how well some of these people can write who really don’t have any experience in this area. “

She praised the efforts of the state and governors to tackle recidivism by implementing programs like hers to help incarcerated people realize their potential.

As much as she enjoys reading her own poetry, as much as Gunter-Seymour says she enjoys elevating the work of others even more. She describes her work as a service to the community and its inhabitants.

“When I accepted this post of Poet Laureate, I see it as service work,” she said. “I like to hear other people read their poetry. I like helping others to write. For me there is a huge competent service.

Gunter-Seymour’s latest work is a book of poetry called “I Thought I Heard a Cardinal Sing”. The book is a collection of anthologies of works by 153 poets from across Ohio who lived in the Appalachian region. Each of the poems highlights the beauty and wonder that can be found there. The book is slated for release in March with a copy to send to every library across the state.

Gunter-Seymour also wrote “A Place So Deep Inside America It Can’t Be Seen,” released in 2020 and “Serving,” released in 2018.

Beyond her writing, Gunter-Seymour worked as a teacher at the EW Scripps School of Journalism at Ohio University. She also founded and is the Executive Director of the Women of Appalachia Project, which aims to combat discrimination against Appalachian women by encouraging women to submit their literary and artistic works.

Among her many other accomplishments, Gunter-Seymour was shortlisted to receive the Ohio Poet of the Year 2020, an Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellowship Award 2021 and to serve in 2021 as Pillar of Prosperity Fellow for the Foundation for Appalachian Ohio. She is also the Learning & Public Practice Artist-in-Residence for the Wexner Center for the Arts – where she works with teens from central Ohio – and the founder, curator and host of Spoken & Heard, a seasonal performance series featuring award-winning poets. , writers and musicians from across the country.

His works have been printed in The NY Times, Verse Daily, World Literature Today, and Poem-a-Day. She is also editor-in-chief of the Women of Appalachia Project’s “Women Speak” anthology series.

“We are so blessed here and sometimes I think we just don’t know it,” Gunter-Seymour said.


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“Studying art and literature helps people become better humans” https://pclunwen.com/studying-art-and-literature-helps-people-become-better-humans/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/studying-art-and-literature-helps-people-become-better-humans/ The study of art, literature and poetry is just as important as the study of science and technology, and studies have proven that integrating the arts with technology, business and d Other areas of knowledge enhance creativity and result in the creation of better human beings. Renowned poet and scholar Dr Pirzada Qasim Raza Siddiqui […]]]>

The study of art, literature and poetry is just as important as the study of science and technology, and studies have proven that integrating the arts with technology, business and d Other areas of knowledge enhance creativity and result in the creation of better human beings.

Renowned poet and scholar Dr Pirzada Qasim Raza Siddiqui said on Monday when launching a thematic calendar at the Karachi Press Club (KPC).

“The study of art, literature and poetry as well as science and technology can help professionals from different backgrounds, especially healthcare professionals, develop the skills necessary to cultivate an environment healing and promote the physical, mental and emotional recovery of patients. It also provides them with the imagination to launch research into the problems facing humanity and come up with innovative solutions, ”said Dr Siddiqui.

The 23rd Thematic Calendar on the Theme of the Human Being in Urdu Poetry was prepared by the Jahan-e-Masiha Adbi Forum led by Khawaja Razi Haider, Director of the Quaid-e-Azam Academy. It was officially launched in a ceremony at the KPC on Monday evening.

Dr Siddiqui said people live mechanical lives these days, but to learn more about themselves they need to study on themselves. Praising the Jahan-e-Masiha Adbi Forum for the continued launch of thematic calendars on various themes including art, culture, literature, poetry, religion as well as Muslim scientists, he said the literary forum was doing great work to promote art and literature. in society.

Haider explained that the Jahan-e-Masiha Adbi Forum has been launching thematic calendars for 22 years and that its 23rd calendar was based on the concept of being human in the eyes of great Urdu poets like Mir, Ghalib, Iqbal and others, who highlighted different aspects concerning the superiority of human beings over all other forms of life on Earth.

The CEO of the pharmaceutical company Pharmevo, Syed Jamshed Ahmed, said he believes in the physical and intellectual well-being of people in the company and, within the framework of social responsibility, prepare thematic calendars, publish books, organize literary activities and promote research in the field of health. .

“This is the 23rd calendar in 22 years and we do months of research every year, involve professionals like Khawaja Razi Haider, seek advice from poets and academics like Professor Qasim Raza Siddiqui and consult with artists, poets, historians to make these calendars an element of art and literature, ”he added.

Psychiatrist Prof Dr Iqbal Afridi was of the opinion that it was a unique idea to use the annual calendar for the dissemination of knowledge and the promotion of poetry. Cardiologist Prof. Muhammad Ishaque said Karachi was known to be a city of poets and literary activities in the 1960s and 1970s. He added that the forum’s calendars should be distributed to students at educational institutions. to promote art and culture.


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Scotland is full of stories to tell in a packed lineup of 2022 events https://pclunwen.com/scotland-is-full-of-stories-to-tell-in-a-packed-lineup-of-2022-events/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 05:06:15 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/scotland-is-full-of-stories-to-tell-in-a-packed-lineup-of-2022-events/ OFTEN overlooked as an essential part of a nation’s well-being, culture has more than proven its worth during the pandemic. Although it is one of the sectors hardest hit by the coronavirus restrictions, musicians, artists, poets, dancers, actors and other directors have tried to adapt as much as possible in order to remain solvent, as […]]]>

OFTEN overlooked as an essential part of a nation’s well-being, culture has more than proven its worth during the pandemic.

Although it is one of the sectors hardest hit by the coronavirus restrictions, musicians, artists, poets, dancers, actors and other directors have tried to adapt as much as possible in order to remain solvent, as well as providing much needed distractions. for a highly stressed population.

Never has the maxim ‘the show must go on’ has been more appropriate, and although most of us are only able, like Burns, to ‘guess and be afraid’ as we look to the future, the industry culture seems poised to demonstrate its resilience throughout 2022.

If Covid restrictions allow, here are some of the highlights already in the pipeline.

CELTIC CONNECTIONS

The year begins with Celtic Connections, which since its inception 29 years ago has become a renowned cultural phenomenon, brightening up the dark days of January.

This year the UK’s first celebration of roots music takes place from January 20 to February 6 with thousands of musicians, spanning traditional folk, roots, Americana, jazz, soul, indie and world music, performing in venues across Glasgow during the 18 day event.

To celebrate Scotland’s Story Year 2022, there will be a number of special events under the Shetland: The Hidden Tales strand marking five and a half centuries since the Shetlands became part of Scotland.

This includes the addition of a new show called A Peerie Foy, a contemporary concert version of a traditional house ceilidh – or “peerie foy” in the Shetland dialect – which will incorporate music, stories and poetry. of some of the island’s most revered cultural talents. , including poets Christie Williamson and Christine De Luca, fiddlers Maurice Henderson, Margaret Robertson, Catriona Macdonald and Chris Stout (below), young jazz saxophonist Norman Willmore and harp innovator Catriona McKay, renowned Fiddlers’ Bid.

This component will feature Sgeulachdan: Tales of the Gaels, a special concert where the stories, myths and reflections of the rich Gaelic culture will come to life through the music and songs of Allan Henderson, Margaret Stewart and special guests at the Mitchell Theater. February 4. .

Celtic Connections 2022 will also pay tribute to some big names in Scottish culture during its 18 days. Beyond the Swelkie, a collection of poetry and prose in English, Scottish and Gaelic celebrating the centenary of Orcadian poet, author and playwright George Mackay Brown (below), will come to life through poet Jim Mackintosh’s readings, visuals and music by Duncan Chisholm and Hamish Napier on January 27.

The National: Writer George MacKay Brown in Kirkwall ... 2/12 / 88..pic: Jim Galloway, Newsquest Media Group..E9103.

Two days later in Òran Mór, Leventime: A Tribute to Jackie Leven will commemorate 10 years since the death of the influential Scottish songwriter and folk musician. Jackie’s partner, Deborah Greenwood, and her friend and colleague Ian Rankin will lead friends and admirers including Boo Hewerdine, Rab Noakes, Jinder, Michael Weston King, Malcolm Lindsay, Doghouse Roses and Dumb Instrument through a selection from his extensive catalog of songs.

NIGHT BURNS

BURNS Night remains a cultural highlight in January in Scotland but unfortunately the pandemic has again hit the Big Burns Supper in Dumfries and Galloway which has been postponed to June 2022 amid rising Covid-19 cases .

However, a free Burns Night show featuring Eddi Reader (below) and special guests will still be live on January 25 at 7 p.m. on Big Burns Supper’s Facebook and YouTube channels. A summer edition of the festival will take place from June 10 to 26 and the majority of shows will be rescheduled, where possible.

The National: Eddi Reader performs on stage during Rewind Scotland 2019 at Scone Palace on July 20, 2019 in Perth.  (Photo by Lorne Thomson / Redferns).

There’s also a Burns Big Night In broadcast live from Bard’s Alloway Cottage on January 22, presented by Edith Bowman and featuring music, song and poetry. It is hosted by the National Trust for Scotland following the success of its first Virtual Burns Supper last year and all proceeds will go to the organization’s conservation work.

Members of the public are invited to participate in a performance for Burns Big Night In by submitting videos of themselves reciting To A Mouse, one of Burns’ most famous poems. A selection of recordings will then be edited together into a video that will be shown overnight to an audience of Burns fans around the world. Submit them as landscape videos saved as MP4 files by January 12th to bbni@luxevents.co.uk

Also on January 25, The Ghosting of Rabbie Burns will be staged at the Macrobert Arts Center in Stirling which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year despite very difficult operating conditions during the pandemic. Starring Burns’ stunning songs and poems, The Ghosting of Rabbie Burns aims to prove that love and relationships haven’t changed much in 200 years after all.

The Macrobert 2022 program also includes A Mother’s Song – In Concert, where some of Scotland’s best folk musicians will come together for an evening of songs from the daring and uplifting new musical A Mother’s Song, which chronicles the incredible journey of music. Scottish folk. across the Atlantic.

THE YEAR OF STORIES IN SCOTLAND

Light up the skies in February, Spectra, Scotland’s festival of lights, returning to Aberdeen. This year’s four-day event is inspired by Scotland’s Story Year 2022. From February 10-13, Spectra will use interactive light sculptures, architectural projections and films to create new ways to explore the city. It will also celebrate the humor, seriousness and daring of Scotland’s best contemporary storytellers by diffusing their prose and poetry in large-scale projections and neon lights on buildings.

The Festival of Lights is part of a national program of over 60 events unveiled to celebrate Scotland’s Year of Stories. These include StAnza, Scotland’s International Poetry Festival, March 7-13 in St Andrews. Since the festival was founded by three local poets in 1998, StAnza has gained an international reputation and last year won the Saboteur Award for the best literary festival in the UK.

He has decided to continue to expand his reach by hosting events online and in person, while Scotland’s Young Makars program aims to empower more people to engage in what is often seen as difficult.

This year, more than 100 poets will bring their languages, cultures, challenges, meditations, experiences and passions to the festival.

An Lanntair from Stornoway is also participating in the Year of Stories and will feature Seanchas – a series of events, films and special commissions celebrating tales from the Hebrides, real and imagined, modern and ancient.

In Skye, SEALL and Gaelic singer Anne Martin will lead An Tinne, a collection of songs, stories and artifacts from across the centuries exploring the deep and fascinating connection between Scotland and Australia, while Findhorn Bay Moray Festival will offer a journey of exploration and discovery. , celebrating the heritage, the landscape and the people of the region.

OTHER events include the Borders Book Festival in Melrose and the Wigtown Book Festival which will feature two new commissions – Into the Nicht, an immersive Dark Skies tour, and Walter in Wonderland, a whirlwind theatrical tour through the history of national literature. .

Celebrating its 75th anniversary in June, the Edinburgh International Film Festival will bring Scotland’s stories to screen in famous places and spaces, while the Dundee Summer (Bash) street festival in July will highlight the city ​​as the homeland of comics, celebrating its characters, stories, history and upcoming talents. Dundee will be renamed Beanotown for the duration, with a pop-up comic book museum, workshops, lectures, film screenings and street entertainment.

In August, the world-renowned Edinburgh International Book Festival will present Scotland’s Stories Now to prove that everyone has a story to tell, with stories collected from across the country and then shared at the flagship event.

In the fall, the Northern Stories Festival run by Lyth Arts Center in Caithness will host a celebration of stories from the Far North.

There are also a number of events that will take place throughout the year, some of which will tour the country.

Approximately 100 events will be supported by the Community Stories Fund, including Weaving with Words: the Magic of Highland Storytelling at Hugh Miller’s Birthplace Museum, which will feature a series of guided walks around Cromarty from April to October, inspired by life and works. of the 19th century geologist, folklorist and social justice activist.

The fonds also supports the telling of the distinctive history of Easterhouse by the Glasgow East Arts Company in collaboration with local residents of Mining Seams and Drawing Wells.


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Choir director puts poetry about immigration to music – Rochester Minnesota news, weather, sports https://pclunwen.com/choir-director-puts-poetry-about-immigration-to-music-rochester-minnesota-news-weather-sports/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 13:02:48 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/choir-director-puts-poetry-about-immigration-to-music-rochester-minnesota-news-weather-sports/ One piece of music may not radically change people’s minds, but David Kassler hopes it will be a good start. Kassler, the musical director of the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, said he started thinking about “Out of Eden,” his next choral piece, about four years ago, after the church invited the recent Rochester Registrars to […]]]>

One piece of music may not radically change people’s minds, but David Kassler hopes it will be a good start.

Kassler, the musical director of the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, said he started thinking about “Out of Eden,” his next choral piece, about four years ago, after the church invited the recent Rochester Registrars to discuss their own immigration stories.

The White House administration at the time was firmly anti-immigration. The issue was constantly in the news, he said.

“When you’re a songwriter, the issues sort of end up in your pen,” he said. And as the great-grandchild of immigrants – a fourth-generation immigrant, if you will – Kassler wanted to take a stand on welcoming people to the United States.

His original idea, to write a booklet using the words of immigrants from Rochester as lyrics, ran into a roadblock.

Kassler is not a writer.

So he turned to poets like writers Winona James Armstrong and Ken McCullough, Ray Gonzalez and Mai Der Vang.

The title of the completed cantata, written for mixed choir and “the king of instruments, the organ” is “Out of Eden”. This stems from the feeling that the Biblical figures were all metaphorical “refugees from Eden,” Kassler said.

One of the major themes of the play is the construction of walls, both figurative and literal, for “others” certain groups of people.

There will be two performances of “Out of Eden”. The first, January 14, will feature St. Paul’s One World Secondary School Choirs before the cantata. The second, January 16, will begin with community members singing songs from their childhood and teaching them to the audience before the cantata begins.

Nisha Kurup, Victim Services Program Manager at the Intercultural Mutual Assistance Association in Rochester, will share “Humko Man Ki Shakti Dena”, an Indian song calling for an end to the division.

“Give us the strength to overcome our negative thoughts and before we try to conquer others, first let us conquer ourselves,” Kurup said. “You know, take away all discrimination. If your friends make mistakes, let’s try to forgive them.”

Kurup is not a professional singer, she says, but she does believe that music is a “powerful connector.”

“All over the world, human miseries and misfortunes are the same,” she said. “Art is a great way to bring people together, to connect and to draw energy from each other.”

There is no ticket price, but a voluntary donation will be collected at both concerts to benefit Catholic Charities, the Intercultural Mutual Assistance Association and the Rochester Area Foundation.

Members of the public are required to wear masks and show proof of vaccination prior to entry.

The cantata will be performed by a choir of professional musicians from the Twin Cities.

Kassler hopes the music will appeal to listeners with diverse backgrounds – and attitudes toward immigration.

“There will be people who disagree with the message and people who agree,” he predicted. “They will be seated together, experiencing the music.”

Kassler hopes that “Out of Eden” will accomplish two tasks: first, that it will encourage listeners to see classical music as a current medium for discussing burning issues.

Second, it “will make us all think about whether or not we are ‘other people’, and what we do to feel more connected to those who are different from us,” he said. “I want people to have an experience that touches them. “

What: “Get out of Eden”

When: 7:30 p.m. Jan. 14, 4 p.m. Jan. 16

Or: Christ United Methodist Church, 400 Fifth Ave. SW, Rochester

Cost: Voluntary donation collected at each concert.


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Biden’s inaugural poet Amanda Gorman publishes New Year’s poem https://pclunwen.com/bidens-inaugural-poet-amanda-gorman-publishes-new-years-poem/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 18:42:09 +0000 https://pclunwen.com/bidens-inaugural-poet-amanda-gorman-publishes-new-years-poem/ President BidenJoe BidenBiden Lawmakers Mourn Harry Reid 29% of GOP Support Efforts to Indict Jan 6 Rioters Charged: Poll Congress Must Meet Time to Hold Big Pharma to Account MOREAmanda Gorman’s inaugural poet published a poem based on the New Year. In collaboration with Instagram, Gorman released her new poem “New Day’s Lyric” on Wednesday, […]]]>

President BidenJoe BidenBiden Lawmakers Mourn Harry Reid 29% of GOP Support Efforts to Indict Jan 6 Rioters Charged: Poll Congress Must Meet Time to Hold Big Pharma to Account MOREAmanda Gorman’s inaugural poet published a poem based on the New Year.

In collaboration with Instagram, Gorman released her new poem “New Day’s Lyric” on Wednesday, in which she reflects on the year 2021 and looks to 2022.

“Come on, look with kindness, for even comfort can come from grief,” Gorman wrote. “We remember, not just for the sake of yesterday, but to face tomorrow.”

“We listen to this old spirit, In the words of a new day, In our hearts we hear it: For auld lang syne, my dear, For auld lang syne,” Gorman said. “Be bold, sing the time this year, be bold, sing the time, for when you honor yesterday you will find tomorrow. Know what we have fought Is not to be forgotten or for anyone.

“It defines us, binds us as one, come on, join this day that has just started. For wherever we meet, we will overcome forever,” concluded Gorman.

Gorman, from Los Angeles, became a household name earlier this year, being the youngest person to recite a poem during a U.S. presidential inauguration, reciting his poem “The Hill We Climb” after Biden and the vice-president President Harris were sworn in.

In an interview with Vanity Fair published wednesday, the 23-year-old poet said she felt “lucky” to partner with Instagram on a project like this.

“I can’t wait to work with Instagram because part of what inspired me to write this New Year’s poem was thinking about the stories and stories I have seen shared over the past two years, which he it’s about coming to terms with grief, loss, social change, climate change, ”Gorman told Vanity Fair. “And so, a lot of these stories, I think, we interact or meet on social media.”



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